Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Lifesaving defibrillators should be as ‘ubiquitous’ as fire extinguishers, doctors say February 28, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — jax allen @ 1:45 pm
 

6 Myths – Eyesight February 24, 2014

Filed under: Health — jax allen @ 10:50 pm
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6 Eye Sight Myths & Truths

Myth: Eating carrots will improve your vision.

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The truth: No studies to date show that your eyesight will get sharper just by eating more carrots. Carrots do, however, contain vitamin A — a nutrient your eyes need to function properly — so a deficiency would be bad news for your eyes. Keep the rabbit food on the menu. Just don’t bother with vitamin A supplements, because your body doesn’t need a ton of the stuff, and getting more than you need of the supplement form can be harmful to your health.

Myth: Working on a computer is bad for your eyes.

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The truth: Computer eyestrain has less to do with computers and more to do with the way you work on them. Most of us forget to blink and take breaks as often as we should while working or reading, so all that time spent staring at the screen can make eyes tired and dry. It might even give you a headache. But it won’t damage your eyes, especially if you treat your eyes right while working.

Myth: Reading in dim light damages your eyes.

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The truth: Reading or doing crossword puzzles in lower light won’t hurt your eyes, but it is very likely to tire them out. That’s the extent of the damage. Still, you should try to make things easier on your eyes and work in adequate lighting as much as possible.

Myth: If you wear glasses or contacts, your eyes will become dependent on them, and your vision will get worse.

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The truth: Wearing glasses or contact lenses doesn’t weaken your eyesight. It’s things like aging, injury, disease, or genetic factors that make vision worse — not using vision correction.

Myth: Sitting too close to the TV is bad for your eyes.

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The truth: Just like when you stare at your computer screen too long, you might get a headache from sitting too close to your TV. But there is no proof that the close distance is damaging. Still, needing to sit closer to the TV might be a sign of nearsightedness, so you may need to have your vision checked.

Myth: Wearing the wrong eyeglasses is bad for your eyes.

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The truth: Wearing the wrong prescription (like someone else’s glasses) or not wearing glasses at all won’t harm your eyes. But only wearing your correct prescription will give you optimal vision — and who wouldn’t want that?

 

5 Simple Exercise Rules February 14, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — jax allen @ 11:43 pm

Simple keys to exercising properly

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1. Start now. Get moving; do some exercise and do it right away.
How long will you wait for your transformation to begin?
This week? This month? Decide NOW or you’ll be reading this again next year!

2. Mix it up. Mix calorie-burning exercise (“cardio”) with muscle-preserving exercise (weight training).
My clients get a mixture of metabolic cardio and resistance training every session!
You should too! You must get out of breath, your muscles must fatigue and ache, and you should long for your next very short break!

3. Build up to 5 hours (slowly). Gradually work your way up to 5 hours of total exercise per week.
That’s less than 45 minutes of activity a day!
You can aim for your 10,000 steps a day or
Choose a 30 minute HIIT session.
Any activity will get you closer to your fat loss target.

4. Progressive overload. Track what you do, and challenge yourself to do a little more, or a little better, every day”
Don’t stick with the same exercises, the same weights routine or the same weekly routines.
Your body adapts in just a couple of weeks – don’t waste your workout time! PROGRESS!

5. As long as you do those 4 things, you’ll lose fat quickly and for good. You’ll build some strong, shapely muscles too. You’ll be able to eat more without regaining body fat. You’ll have more energy, feel great and look fabulous.

Jax Allen

 

Amazing Super Seniors #20 February 12, 2014

Filed under: Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 8:00 am
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Super seniors #20

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Hershel McGriff: The NASCAR Veteran
Life is a (very fast) highway for Hershel McGriff. He started racing cars in 1945; in 1989, at age 61, he became the oldest driver to win a NASCAR race.

But he hasn’t turned off the ignition yet: At 81, he recently competed in a national NASCAR race at Portland International Raceway, finishing 13th. NASCAR racing may be dangerous, but that doesn’t faze this Motorsports Hall of Famer.

Perhaps it’s this need for speed that keeps McGriff young at heart. “As long as I’m fast, I’m [having fun],” he said on his Web site.

Jax x

 

Amazing Super Seniors #19 February 10, 2014

Filed under: Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 8:00 am
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Super seniors # 19

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Jeannie Epper: The Senior Superhero

Many consider her “the greatest stuntwoman who’s ever lived,” according to Entertainment Weekly. Epper may be a great-grandmother, but that doesn’t stop her from jumping through glass windows and escaping from burning buildings at the ripe age of 70. In the 1970s, she served as Lynda Carter’s stunt double in the TV series Wonder Woman. Today she still performs stunts in such movies as The Back-Up Plan, The Fast and the Furious, and Kill Bill.

In fact, she’s cheated death in more than 100 Hollywood films, and she received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Taurus World Stunt Awards in 2009. Does Epper ever worry about her safety? Confidence may be the key to her success: ”As far as I’m concerned, whenever I do a stunt, it’s 150 percent going to work out,” she told EW.

 

7 Anti Ageing Foods February 8, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 6:14 pm
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7 Anti-Aging Foods (everyone over 40 should eat)
By Certified Nutritionist Joel Marion

If you’re over 40 and want to defy each passing year while promoting more youthful hair, nails and skin, the below 7 foods will help you stock up on some of the most powerful anti-aging nutrients around.

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1. Olive Oil – Not only do the monounsaturated fats contained in olive oil support healthy arteries and a healthy heart, but olive oil also contains polyphenols, a potent anti-oxidant that may help prevent a number of age-related diseases.
Choose organic extra virgin olive oil for the most anti-aging bang for your buck.

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2. Red Wine – That’s right, a glass of wine daily may indeed have a positive effect on your health due to its resveratrol content, a unique anti-oxidant that can help fight against diabetes, heart disease, and age-related memory loss.

3. Beans – The unique proteins in beans thicken and strengthen your hair cells, so you can enjoy a full head of hair as you lengthen your years. 🙂

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4. Brazil Nuts – Brazil nuts are rich in selenium, a mineral which aids in the production of the anti-oxidant glutathione to help slow down the skin aging process. Just 2 nuts a day will provide you with enough selenium to reap its anti-aging benefits.

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5. Tomatoes – Tomatoes are rich in lycopene, which has been shown to support heart health and healthy cholesterol levels as you age. Lycopene also acts as a natural sun block to keep skin youthful and protected from harmful UV rays.

JaxAllenFitness.com

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6. Raspberries & Blueberries – These two berries contain important anti-oxidants to help offset inflammation and oxidative stress that contribute to skin aging and wrinkles. Just one serving of either or these berries contains more anti-oxidants than 10 servings of most other fruits and vegetables!

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7. Organic Eggs – Despite the bad rap eggs get because of their cholesterol content, which is based on completely erroneous science, eggs are rich in biotin and iron which help to promote healthy, youthful skin and hair.

Now, apart from stocking up on anti-oxidants and other anti-aging vitamins and minerals via the above foods, there is one other extremely important nutrient that you won’t find in the above foods that very well may hold the key to ULTIMATE health and longevity…

WATER!

Eat Clean Train Hard Feel Great

 

Amazing Super Seniors # 18

Filed under: Uncategorized — jax allen @ 7:30 am

Super Seniors #18

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Hank Brunjes: The Two-Stepping Septuagenarian
It takes energy, dedication, and a whole lot of talent to make it on Broadway. And for Frank Brunjes, the performance bug has stuck with him well into his seventies. Brooklyn-born Brunjes started dancing when he was 4, was barely 20 when he launched his Broadway career as an ensemble cast member in Pal Joey, and was part of the original cast of West Side Story in 1957.

Now, at the age of 78, he still sings and dances as a regular in the Fabulous Palm Springs Follies in Palm Springs, Calif. How does he feel about performing nearly 190 shows a year? “It’s great to have a job where I can express my talents and abilities,” he says in his Follies bio. “Never make the mistake of thinking you’re too old for anything!”

Inspiring eh?

Jax x

 

Vitamin D – Why? February 7, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 5:56 pm
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Vitamin D – Why?

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Even though I was lucky enough to have a week in Barbados this Winter, I love the mouth spray method of supplementing this important nutrient. They taste great, are good value and very easy to use.
NOTE: may help (can’t hurt) with weight loss!

Effective for:
Treating conditions that cause weak and painful bones (osteomalacia).
Low levels of phosphate in the blood (familial hypophosphatemia).
Low levels of phosphate in the blood due to a disease called Fanconi syndrome.
Psoriasis (with a specialized prescription-only form of vitamin D).
Low blood calcium levels because of a low parathyroid thyroid hormone levels.
Helping prevent low calcium and bone loss (renal osteodystrophy) in people with kidney failure.
Rickets.
Vitamin D deficiency.

Likely Effective for:
Treating osteoporosis (weak bones). Taking a specific form of vitamin D called cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) along with calcium seems to help prevent bone loss and bone breaks.
Preventing falls in older people. Researchers noticed that people who don’t have enough vitamin D tend to fall more often than other people. They found that taking a vitamin D supplement reduces the risk of falling by up to 22%. Higher doses of vitamin D are more effective than lower doses. One study found that taking 800 IU of vitamin D reduced the risk of falling, but lower doses didn’t.

Also, vitamin D, in combination with calcium, but not calcium alone, may prevent falls by decreasing body sway and blood pressure. This combination prevents more falls in women than men.
Reducing bone loss in people taking drugs called corticosteroids.

Possibly Effective for:
Reducing the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). Studies show taking vitamin D seems to reduce women’s risk of getting MS by up to 40%. Taking at least 400 IU per day, the amount typically found in a multivitamin supplement, seems to work the best.
Preventing cancer. Some research shows that people who take a high-dose vitamin D supplement plus calcium might have a lower chance of developing cancer of any type.
Weight loss. Women taking calcium plus vitamin D are more likely to lose weight and maintain their weight. But this benefit is mainly in women who didn’t get enough calcium before they started taking supplements.
Respiratory infections. Clinical research in school aged children shows that taking a vitamin D supplement during winter might reduce the chance of getting seasonal flu. Other research suggests that taking a vitamin D supplement might reduce the chance of an asthma attack triggered by a cold or other respiratory infection. Some additional research suggests that children with low levels of vitamin D have a higher chance of getting a respiratory infection such as the common cold or flu.
Reducing the risk of rheumatoid arthritis in older women.
Reducing bone loss in women with a condition called hyperparathyroidism.
Preventing tooth loss in the elderly.

How Much?
The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
For preventing osteoporosis and fractures: 400-1000 IU per day has been used for older adults. Some experts recommended higher doses of 1000-2000 IU daily.
For preventing falls: 800-1000 IU/day has been used in combination with calcium 1000-1200 mg/day.
For preventing multiple sclerosis (MS): long-term consumption of at least 400 IU per day, mainly in the form of a multivitamin supplement, has been used.
For preventing all cancer types: calcium 1400-1500 mg/day plus vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) 1100 IU/day in postmenopausal women has been used.
For muscle pain caused by medications called “statins”: vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) or vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) 50,000 units once a week or 400 IU daily.
For preventing the flu: vitamin D (cholecalciferol) 1200 IU daily.
Most vitamin supplements contain only 400 IU (10 mcg) vitamin D.

The Institute of Medicine publishes recommended daily allowance (RDA), which is an estimate of the amount of vitamin D that meets the needs of most people in the population. The current RDA was set in 2010. The RDA varies based on age as follows: 1-70 years of age, 600 IU daily; 71 years and older, 800 IU daily; pregnant and lactating women, 600 IU daily. For infants ages 0-12 months, an adequate intake (AI) level of 400 IU is recommended.

Some organizations are recommending higher amounts. In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics increased the recommended minimum daily intake of vitamin D to 400 IU daily for all infants and children, including adolescents. Parents should not use vitamin D liquids dosed as 400 IU/drop. Giving one dropperful or mL by mistake can deliver 10,000 IU/day. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will force companies to provide no more than 400 IU per dropperful in the future.

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends vitamin D 400 IU to 800 IU daily for adults under age 50, and 800 IU to 1000 IU daily for older adults.

The North American Menopause Society recommends 700 IU to 800 IU daily for women at risk of deficiency due to low sun (e.g., homebound, northern latitude) exposure.

Guidelines from the Osteoporosis Society of Canada recommend vitamin D 400 IU per day for people up to age 50, and 800 IU per day for people over 50. Osteoporosis Canada now recommends 400-1000 IU daily for adults under the age of 50 years and 800-2000 IU daily for adults over the age of 50 years.

The Canadian Cancer Society recommends 1000 IU/day during the fall and winter for adults in Canada. For those with a higher risk of having low vitamin D levels, this dose should be taken year round. This includes people who have dark skin, usually wear clothing that covers most of their skin, and people who are older or who don’t go outside often.

Many experts now recommend using vitamin D supplements containing cholecalciferol in order to meet these intake levels. This seems to be more potent than another form of vitamin D called ergocalciferol.

JaxAllenFitness

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Amazing Super Senior #17

Filed under: Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 8:25 am
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Frances Woofenden: The Super Skiing Senior

 

Less Than 30 mins Activity In 28 Days! February 5, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 4:07 pm
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Less Than 30 mins activity in 28 days!

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I truly believe we can do better.
Community fitness classes and cheap gyms haven’t made the impact hoped for.

A few days ago I saw a report about special Aqua sessions for those with very high BMI.

This morning I received the report below, and want to DO something about the situation. I’ve been teaching fitness since 1983, seniors since 1995 and Fatloss since 2009.
Last year I qualified as a Metabolic coach so know I could make a difference, if I can get them involved.

I’m looking for studio space and more important Pools to use and promote. If you can help please get in touch!

ukactive release ‘Turning the tide of inactivity report’
Today, ukactive have released the “Turning the tide of inactivity” report which has used local authority figures to calculate the number of people that are officially classed as “inactive” because they did not carry out half an hour of exercise in a 28 day period.

Problems resulting from a sedentary lifestyle are blamed for 17 per cent of premature deaths and cost the economy more than £8bn a year.

In the report, ukactive said: “Over the past 50 years, physical activity levels have declined by 20 per cent in the UK, with projections indicating a further 15 per cent drop by 2030.

“If this trend continues, by 2030 the average British person will use only 25 per cent more energy than they would have done had they just spent the day in bed.”

In the report Lord Sebastian Coe said: “Supporting people that do little or no daily activity to become a bit more active is where the biggest public health gains can be made.”

James Samuel, Event Director of Leisure Industry Week (LIW) said: “LIW are fully committed to helping ukactive in their mission to turn the tide of inactivity and get the country fit and healthy. We urge our LIW community to also continue to push the message to their own customers and databases so as an industry we can help make a difference.”

This report is a must read as it contains insight at a national and local level. Use this link to view the full report. http://www.liw.co.uk/inactivityreport/

Please pass this on to anyone you think might help, either by spreading the word, providing space a pool or funding for this community project.

Jax Allen Fitness.