Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Vitamin D – Why? February 7, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 5:56 pm
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Vitamin D – Why?

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Even though I was lucky enough to have a week in Barbados this Winter, I love the mouth spray method of supplementing this important nutrient. They taste great, are good value and very easy to use.
NOTE: may help (can’t hurt) with weight loss!

Effective for:
Treating conditions that cause weak and painful bones (osteomalacia).
Low levels of phosphate in the blood (familial hypophosphatemia).
Low levels of phosphate in the blood due to a disease called Fanconi syndrome.
Psoriasis (with a specialized prescription-only form of vitamin D).
Low blood calcium levels because of a low parathyroid thyroid hormone levels.
Helping prevent low calcium and bone loss (renal osteodystrophy) in people with kidney failure.
Rickets.
Vitamin D deficiency.

Likely Effective for:
Treating osteoporosis (weak bones). Taking a specific form of vitamin D called cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) along with calcium seems to help prevent bone loss and bone breaks.
Preventing falls in older people. Researchers noticed that people who don’t have enough vitamin D tend to fall more often than other people. They found that taking a vitamin D supplement reduces the risk of falling by up to 22%. Higher doses of vitamin D are more effective than lower doses. One study found that taking 800 IU of vitamin D reduced the risk of falling, but lower doses didn’t.

Also, vitamin D, in combination with calcium, but not calcium alone, may prevent falls by decreasing body sway and blood pressure. This combination prevents more falls in women than men.
Reducing bone loss in people taking drugs called corticosteroids.

Possibly Effective for:
Reducing the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). Studies show taking vitamin D seems to reduce women’s risk of getting MS by up to 40%. Taking at least 400 IU per day, the amount typically found in a multivitamin supplement, seems to work the best.
Preventing cancer. Some research shows that people who take a high-dose vitamin D supplement plus calcium might have a lower chance of developing cancer of any type.
Weight loss. Women taking calcium plus vitamin D are more likely to lose weight and maintain their weight. But this benefit is mainly in women who didn’t get enough calcium before they started taking supplements.
Respiratory infections. Clinical research in school aged children shows that taking a vitamin D supplement during winter might reduce the chance of getting seasonal flu. Other research suggests that taking a vitamin D supplement might reduce the chance of an asthma attack triggered by a cold or other respiratory infection. Some additional research suggests that children with low levels of vitamin D have a higher chance of getting a respiratory infection such as the common cold or flu.
Reducing the risk of rheumatoid arthritis in older women.
Reducing bone loss in women with a condition called hyperparathyroidism.
Preventing tooth loss in the elderly.

How Much?
The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
For preventing osteoporosis and fractures: 400-1000 IU per day has been used for older adults. Some experts recommended higher doses of 1000-2000 IU daily.
For preventing falls: 800-1000 IU/day has been used in combination with calcium 1000-1200 mg/day.
For preventing multiple sclerosis (MS): long-term consumption of at least 400 IU per day, mainly in the form of a multivitamin supplement, has been used.
For preventing all cancer types: calcium 1400-1500 mg/day plus vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) 1100 IU/day in postmenopausal women has been used.
For muscle pain caused by medications called “statins”: vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) or vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) 50,000 units once a week or 400 IU daily.
For preventing the flu: vitamin D (cholecalciferol) 1200 IU daily.
Most vitamin supplements contain only 400 IU (10 mcg) vitamin D.

The Institute of Medicine publishes recommended daily allowance (RDA), which is an estimate of the amount of vitamin D that meets the needs of most people in the population. The current RDA was set in 2010. The RDA varies based on age as follows: 1-70 years of age, 600 IU daily; 71 years and older, 800 IU daily; pregnant and lactating women, 600 IU daily. For infants ages 0-12 months, an adequate intake (AI) level of 400 IU is recommended.

Some organizations are recommending higher amounts. In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics increased the recommended minimum daily intake of vitamin D to 400 IU daily for all infants and children, including adolescents. Parents should not use vitamin D liquids dosed as 400 IU/drop. Giving one dropperful or mL by mistake can deliver 10,000 IU/day. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will force companies to provide no more than 400 IU per dropperful in the future.

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends vitamin D 400 IU to 800 IU daily for adults under age 50, and 800 IU to 1000 IU daily for older adults.

The North American Menopause Society recommends 700 IU to 800 IU daily for women at risk of deficiency due to low sun (e.g., homebound, northern latitude) exposure.

Guidelines from the Osteoporosis Society of Canada recommend vitamin D 400 IU per day for people up to age 50, and 800 IU per day for people over 50. Osteoporosis Canada now recommends 400-1000 IU daily for adults under the age of 50 years and 800-2000 IU daily for adults over the age of 50 years.

The Canadian Cancer Society recommends 1000 IU/day during the fall and winter for adults in Canada. For those with a higher risk of having low vitamin D levels, this dose should be taken year round. This includes people who have dark skin, usually wear clothing that covers most of their skin, and people who are older or who don’t go outside often.

Many experts now recommend using vitamin D supplements containing cholecalciferol in order to meet these intake levels. This seems to be more potent than another form of vitamin D called ergocalciferol.

JaxAllenFitness

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Amazing Super Senior #17

Filed under: Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 8:25 am
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Frances Woofenden: The Super Skiing Senior

 

Less Than 30 mins Activity In 28 Days! February 5, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 4:07 pm
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Less Than 30 mins activity in 28 days!

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I truly believe we can do better.
Community fitness classes and cheap gyms haven’t made the impact hoped for.

A few days ago I saw a report about special Aqua sessions for those with very high BMI.

This morning I received the report below, and want to DO something about the situation. I’ve been teaching fitness since 1983, seniors since 1995 and Fatloss since 2009.
Last year I qualified as a Metabolic coach so know I could make a difference, if I can get them involved.

I’m looking for studio space and more important Pools to use and promote. If you can help please get in touch!

ukactive release ‘Turning the tide of inactivity report’
Today, ukactive have released the “Turning the tide of inactivity” report which has used local authority figures to calculate the number of people that are officially classed as “inactive” because they did not carry out half an hour of exercise in a 28 day period.

Problems resulting from a sedentary lifestyle are blamed for 17 per cent of premature deaths and cost the economy more than £8bn a year.

In the report, ukactive said: “Over the past 50 years, physical activity levels have declined by 20 per cent in the UK, with projections indicating a further 15 per cent drop by 2030.

“If this trend continues, by 2030 the average British person will use only 25 per cent more energy than they would have done had they just spent the day in bed.”

In the report Lord Sebastian Coe said: “Supporting people that do little or no daily activity to become a bit more active is where the biggest public health gains can be made.”

James Samuel, Event Director of Leisure Industry Week (LIW) said: “LIW are fully committed to helping ukactive in their mission to turn the tide of inactivity and get the country fit and healthy. We urge our LIW community to also continue to push the message to their own customers and databases so as an industry we can help make a difference.”

This report is a must read as it contains insight at a national and local level. Use this link to view the full report. http://www.liw.co.uk/inactivityreport/

Please pass this on to anyone you think might help, either by spreading the word, providing space a pool or funding for this community project.

Jax Allen Fitness.

 

Amazing Super Seniors – 16 February 4, 2014

Filed under: Fun,Health,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 10:25 pm
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Ernestine Shepherd: Oldest Female Bodybuilder

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Ernestine is the world’s oldest bodybuilder and not missing a step at 74-years-old. Her daily routine entails waking up at 3 am to run and lift weights. Ernestine is inspired by Sylvester Stallone as she is a die-hard Rocky fan. Ernestine runs over 80 miles a week and can bench press 150 pounds! How many miles are you running a week? I bet (hope) this makes you want to run more, whatever your answer may be.

Well, maybe not run! But definitely walk more, play more and live more!!