Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

3 Steps to Solve Age Related Fat September 30, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — jax allen @ 8:33 pm

3 Steps to Solve Age-Related Fat Gain…

To stop age-related muscle loss and fat gain is EASY and it’s something that any of us can do.

Just send the correct signal to your body to say “maintain muscle and burn fat”.

How?

IMG_1318.JPG

By moving. But ONLY in the optimal metabolic way. Doing the right movements spikes your metabolic rate, rebuilds muscle and burns fat for energy in 3 steps:

Step #1: The right metabolic movements drive sugar (glucose) and fat (fatty acids) into your muscle cells to be used as fuel. This prevents your fat cells from sucking it in and turning it into fat.

Step #2: Once the fuel gets into your muscle cells, it needs to be burned or it’ll just get sucked back into your fat cells. That’s why it’s so important to make sure you are doing the RIGHT type of movement — one that builds more of your fuel-burning furnaces called mitochondria.

Step #3: You need to consistently repeat these movements over time — that’s when the magic happens. You’ll create new lean, toned muscle mass, which sucks in even more fuel to be burned, prevents your fat cells from getting fatter and gives you tons of energy.

IMG_1316.JPG

Remember, just because you might be over 40, 50, 60, or even 70, it doesn’t mean you are doomed to have a slow metabolism, low energy or uncontrollable fat gain.

The key is to get moving, using the right metabolic movements unleash your full fat burning and muscle shaping potential in a scientifically proven way.

Stay Active. Eat Clean. Feel Great

Jax

Advertisements
 

10 Cold and Flu Tips September 20, 2014

Filed under: Health,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 9:46 am
Tags: , , , , ,

It’s Cold & Flu season so here are the 10 Worst Things for Your Immune System in hopes that you would do your best to avoid the bugs and stay healthy this winter. 🙂

IMG_0877.JPG
Here we go:

1. Processed foods
An overburdened digestive system steals energy from your immune system, leaving the immune system operating on “less cylinders.” To unburden your digestive system, eat as few processed foods as possible. This will restore power to your immune system.

2. Insufficient sleep
Sleep is a time for the body to recharge. A study from the University of Chicago showed that men who slept 4 hours a night after one week had half the number of serum flu-fighting antibodies as did men who slept 7.5 – 8.5 hours.

3. Pessimism
Though some people seem to be born either pessimistic or optimistic, make efforts to think like an optimist. A UCLA study showed that optimistic law students at the beginning of their first semester had more immune system cells by mid-semester, than did students who were pessimistic.

Though it seems obvious that optimists take better care of themselves, the researchers have not ruled out a physiological basis for this disparity.

4. Locking in emotions
Keeping emotions bottled up can suppress the action of the immune system’s killer T cells. On the other hand, unleashing emotions with a nasty fury has been shown to result in fewer killer T cells.

So while it’s bad to sit and stew, it’s also bad to throw temper tantrums. Find a happy medium…
Use your transformation journal!

5. Losing out to stress
Mismanagement of stress suppresses your immune response, including making killer T cells sluggish, plus lowering their quantity. Though certain stressful situations cannot be avoided, figure out which ones can, then avoid them.

For example, leave for work 10 minutes earlier so that slow-movement in bottleneck traffic isn’t as unnerving.

6. Use Your Own Pen
(Use sanitising gel after chip& pin)
Avoid touching community-handled objects such as pens at the grocery store, bank, doctor’s office, etc. Communal pens are loaded with germs. Have your own pen on you at all times. The handle of a shopping cart is also very germy; rather than push here, pull it at the other end; fewer hands have been there. Yes, you will get a few funny looks! When it’s colder wear trendy gloves!

7. Insufficient exercise Doh!
You know I had to mention it. ;-b
Rigorous bouts of exercise toughen up the immune system. If you’re a local reader who wants to try us out, contact me for a 7 day FREE trial. If you’re not in the CHELTENHAM area, follow my blogs http://www.jaxallenfitness.com
http://www.superseniorssolutionsuk.com
And friend me on Facebook – Jax Allen and you can join or follow the groups that interest you.

IMG_0941.JPG

While we’re talking exercise consider using washable training gloves and yoga socks or your own exercise mat! Just watch the cleaning regime in your gym – handles, seats, mats should be sprayed and wiped down or better still steam cleaned – but I know it doesn’t happen!
Ps I have a cleaning contract for my studio exercise mats. Plus anti bacterial spray for kit. Even a supply of washable gloves !

8. Exposure to secondhand smoke
Forbid people to light up in your car or house. Avoid being near smokers outside. Secondhand smoke is truly a health hazard and can cripple your immune system, killing around 3,000 nonsmokers a year with lung cancer, and resulting in 300,000 childhood cases a year of lower respiratory-tract infections.

9. Misuse of antibiotics
Some people who take antibiotics have diminished levels of cytokines, which are important components of your immune system. When you are prescribed antibiotics, use them immediately and finish the entire prescription. Don’t ask for antibiotics, if you need them ur GP will suggest them and then complete the course. Also, while you should always take a probiotic, you may want to double up when you’re taking antibiotics.

10. Being a gateway to pathogens
Many people get sick simply because they put a finger to their eye, nose, mouth or ear–portals through which microscopic villains enter the body. Resolve not to touch these portals while in public. Pick your nose at home. LOL!

If an eye or your nose itches, then place a tissue or napkin between your finger and skin to scratch the area. Be aware of how often your fingers are at your mouth as you read something in public like a restaurant menu (another very germy communal object).

Although it will be challenging to make these adjustments, keep at it, and over time, they’ll become second nature.

Stay Healthy!
Train Hard
Eat Clean
Feel Great!!

Jax x

 

12 Ancient Grains September 19, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:04 am
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

12 Ancient Grains that you should consider.

IMG_1583.JPG

Grains like wheat, corn, oats, and rice are the most popular on the market, but ancient grains are making a comeback. Now available in many specialty health food stores like Whole Foods, these delicious grains offer more of a variety of tastes, textures, and nutrients. Some of them are even gluten-free, making them a great alternative for grain-lovers suffering from gluten intolerances. Try one (or all) of the tasty grains on our list below.

1. Polenta

A staple in Northern Italian cooking, polenta is made from ground yellow or white corn that has had the germ removed. This gluten-free, complex carbohydrate has more protein than a large egg (8.1 g per serving), and is a great alternative to bread and pasta. A single serving of polenta provides six percent of the recommended daily amount of vitamin A and 10 percent of the daily amount of vitamin C. Stone-ground whole grain cornmeal polenta is the healthiest choice. Polenta made from whole grain corn also supplies good amounts of iron, thiamin, zinc, phosphorous, and magnesium. Serve up polenta baked, boiled, or grilled as a main or side dish.

2. Bulgur

A great alternative to rice or couscous and often used in soups and salads, bulgur is a grain often used in Middle Eastern cuisine. It’s made from hard red wheat and sometimes softer, white wheat. Bulgur is high in fibre (18.3 g per serving) and manganese. It also contains 26 percent of your recommended daily needs of niacin, 14 percent of iron, and 17 percent of vitamin B6. Quick and easy to cool, bulgur can blend easily with toasted nuts (walnuts, pine nuts, pecans), berries, or sauteed veggies to make a healthy side dish. It also goes great with chicken and beef. Try blending bulgur with wheat berries and quinoa to create a fresh, light side dish.

3. Amaranth

One of the world’s oldest grains, amaranth is a South American grain that can be used in place of rice. Both gluten- and wheat-free, amaranth is high in protein (9 g per cup) and amino acids that help build brain cells like lysine, cysteine, and methionine, which aren’t found in as high concentrations in other grains. A single serving of amaranth has up to seven percent of vitamin C, 42 percent of iron, and 16 percent of calcium needs for the day. Cook amaranth in water or chicken stock with vegetables for dinner. It’s nutty, malty taste also makes it a perfect choice for breakfast when blended with nuts, dried fruit, and milk.

4. Farro

Farro, also referred to as emmer, is a wheat grain that was one of the first domesticated crops in the Fertile Crescent thousands of years ago and was used in Egyptian bread making. Farro is high in fibre (5 g per serving) and protein (6 g per serving) and provides 20 percent of your daily needs for niacin and 15 percent of your daily needs for magnesium and zinc. Farro is commonly used in Italy as a whole grain in soup, pasta, risotto, and salad dishes. It can also be used to make bread and baked goods.

5. Spelt

Spelt is an ancient grain that was commonly eaten in medieval times. While it’s part of the wheat family, people with wheat intolerances are often able to eat spelt. A single serving of spelt is high is in fibre (5 g) and protein (6 g), and provides 14 percent of the daily recommended value of magnesium and zinc, and 25 percent of iron. Spelt can be used in place or rice and pasta, used as an oatmeal alternative, or used to make muffins, waffles, pancakes, and bread.

6. Wheat Berries

A wheat berry is the entire wheat kernel, including the bran, endosperm, and germ, meaning it is a whole grain. The third most abundant crop worldwide, following rice and corn, wheat berries are a great source of healthy carbohydrates. Nutrient count varies depending on the type of wheat berries you select. They can be soft or hard and come in a variety of colors. Overall, wheat berries are high in fiber and protein and contain a variety of nutrients including vitamin E, calcium, B vitamins, folate, and potassium. Eat wheat berries in place of pasta, rice, and other grains, or use them in salads and side dishes. They’re also a great alternative to oatmeal when blended with fresh fruit and nuts.

7. Buckwheat

Buckwheat groats, also called kasha, are hulled grains from the buckwheat plant often found in Eastern Europe and Russia. Buckwheat is low in fat and offers eight percent of the daily value of niacin, six percent for vitamin B6, four percent for riboflavin and thiamin, 21 percent for magnesium, 12 percent for copper and phosphorous, and 7 percent for iron and zinc. It also contains all essential amino acids, making it a complete protein which helps with muscle-building. Add cooked buckwheat to salads, use it as a side dish, or add fruit and honey for a healthy oatmeal alternative.

8. Millet

Millet is a small, whole grain food that is a staple grain in many Asian and African countries. Whole grains like millet have been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer, and millet has also been shown to decrease the incidence of stomach ulcers. A cup of millet has just 207 calories, 6 g of protein, and 2 g of fibre. It’s also cholesterol-free and only has 3 mg of sodium per serving. Millet is also gluten-free. Quick to brown in a frying pan or pot, millet can be mixed with seasoned veggies, meats, spicy beans, and other flavorful foods.

9. Kamut

A form of grain grown in many cultures and is believed to have first been grown in Egypt or Asia, kamut is two to three times the size of common wheat and has 20-40 percent more protein and 65 percent more amino acids. Kamut is also high in essential fatty acids, which can help lower bad LDL-cholesterol and raise good HDL-cholesterol. It’s a particularly good source for thiamin, niacin, folate, riboflavin, vitamin B6, vitamin E, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, and complex carbohydrates. Similar to dried beans, kamut needs to soak for several hours before cooking. Once cooked, use it to replace rice in side dishes or use kamut powder for baking.

10. Quinoa
(My favourite for porridge)
Found in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, Chile, and Peru, quinoa means “mother grain” in Inca. Quinoa is a complete protein, meaning it has all nine essential amino acids, which have been shown to boost immunity, improve muscle quality, and regulate hormone production. It’s also a great source of high-quality protein (8 g per serving), fibre, and riboflavin, thiamin, and niacin, which help your body metabolize energy. Quinoa provides 20 percent of the iron and phosphorus that you require every day, along with 9 percent of potassium and 2 percent of calcium. A versatile, delicious grain, quinoa can easily substitute for rice and couscous in recipes, or serve it with fresh veggies.

11. Barley

Barley is a rich, bulky grain originally from Ethiopia and Southwest Asia. A nutrient dense food, barley is high in fibre, B vitamins, iron, copper, manganese, and selenium. This blend of nutrients has been linked to increased immunity and a more efficient metabolism. Barley is also low in calories and not as starchy as pasta and rice. Before cooking, always rinse barley thoroughly and use 3 cups of water for every cup of barley. Use barley flower to make breads, muffins, and cookies, stir-fry it with vegetables, or blend it stews and soups.

12. Teff

Teff, the world’s smallest grain, is made from the seed of an Ethiopian grass and made up mostly of bran and germ. This gluten-free, nutrient-dense grain contains high-quality carbs, protein (26 g per serving), minerals, and fibre, and is high in the nutrients calcium, thiamin, and iron (it has twice as much as wheat and barley). Uncooked teff can be used in baking cakes, breads, and muffins in place of small grains or seeds. For a meal, blend teff into soups and stews. It serves as a nutritious thickening agent, making it great for heavier, cool weather meals.

Eat Clean. Stay Active. Feel Great.
Jax

 

Daily Walk Like Magic Pill September 17, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Fun,Health — jax allen @ 2:03 pm
Tags: , , ,

By Telegraph Reporter
12:18AM BST 11 Sep 2014

IMG_1580.JPG

Walking half an hour a day can prevent obesity and diabetes, lower the risk of some cancers, and relieve depression and anxiety, scientist says

Walking for half an hour a day is equivalent to taking a “magic pill” that combats ageing and prevents early death, a doctor has claimed.

Dr James Brown, from the School of Life and Health Sciences at Aston University, told the British Science Festival in Birmingham it could help prevent obesity and diabetes, lower the risk of some cancers, relieve depression and anxiety, increase mobility and reduce the chance of hip fractures by 40 per cent among older adults.

It also improved the ability to think and reason, slowed the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, cut arthritic pain by half, raised energy levels, reduced fatigue and led to a 23 per cent lower risk of dying.

Dr Brown said: “All of these changes are not seen in people who run marathons; they are not seen in people who lift weights in the gym, or spend four hours running on the treadmill. These are seen in people who walk and who walk for half an hour a day.

“You can get all of these health benefits, you can get a reduction in all of these diseases that are associated with ageing, by just keeping active, by walking for half an hour a day.”

Dr Carol Holland, from Aston University’s Centre for Healthy Ageing, backed his statement, saying: “Thirty minutes of moderate exercise a day can reduce your risk of age-related diseases. It can also reduce your risk of cognitive decline.”

 

Can’t Lose Fat? – maybe You Need More Sleep! September 14, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 3:45 pm
Tags: , , , ,

An interesting article for you that ties in with lots of studies about Fatloss…….

The facts on the effects of sleep on fat loss
By
Krista Boulding / Campbell River Courier-Islander
September 5, 2014 12:00 AM

What does sleep have to do with fat loss? Quite a bit actually.

20140914-163202-59522201.jpg

The most obvious connection is that when we’re exhausted we make less healthy choices; we seek out sugar, caffeine, and fast food to fill the energy reservoir quickly. We don’t have the motivation to make healthy meals from scratch, go to the gym, or walk the dog. Our willpower and drive are greatly diminished and we can’t resist those temptations we normally say no to.

On a deeper level, there is a reason for this. Sleep deprivation completely messes with our hormones. The infamous stress hormone cortisol goes on the rise. And we all know what that means: high cortisol = more belly fat! Grehlin, the hormone in charge of our hunger signals, increases. And Leptin, the hormone that keeps us satiated, decreases. So that leaves us really hungry and never satisfied…oh boy! Another alarming result of sleep deprivation is an increase in insulin resistance. Insulin is the hormone in charge of keeping blood sugar levels in check, and it also manages our fat storage. If you have insulin resistance, you will not process dietary carbohydrates properly, blood sugar levels rise, and you lose the ability to effectively burn fat. Not only that, but your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes increases significantly!

Another interesting fact: if you forgo sleep to wake up at the crack of dawn for your regular 5:30 a.m. boot camp, or morning 5 km run, you may actually GAIN weight. Yeah, I know, that is how important sleep is! Despite all those calories you’re burning, if you’re in a sleep deficit, your body will not respond well. Exercising in the morning is wonderful, don’t get me wrong. But pressing snooze once in awhile and skipping your workout when you’ve had a rough night, can actually benefit your waistline.

Just an aside, for all the ladies going through menopause and gaining weight despite maintaining a healthy diet, focus on your sleep and reducing your stress levels and you will see results!

20140914-162931-59371644.jpg

———————————————————————————————————–
I always tell my clients, work on sleep FIRST. Aim for a minimum of seven hours per night. Get off the computer, shut the TV off, and go to bed! It won’t matter how much you exercise or how good your diet is, if you’re sleep deprived you will struggle with fat loss and you may even gain some. Sweet dreams!

Stay Active. Eat Well. Learn to Relax

Jax

 

Fats – choose them wisely!

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 6:56 am
Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Skinny on Choosing Fats

<a href="https://superseniorssolutionsuk.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/img_1240.jpg”>IMG_1240.JPG

Processed seed and veggie oils are very high in Omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. As you know when the Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio shifts too high in favour of Omega-6, bad things happen in your body.
The excess Omega-6 can cause inflammation (1)
Inflammation is linked to cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, arthritis and more.
Studies also show that Omega-6 fatty acids may increase death from heart disease.

So, when you are told to avoid saturated fats consider what you are the alternatives are doing to your body.
I would NEVER encourage you to go Low Fat either. Your body needs fats – they’re not called Essential Fatty Acid for nothing!

REFERENCES
2. Rose, G. A., Thomson, W. B., & Williams, R. T. (1965). Corn oil in treatment of ischaemic heart disease. British medical journal, 1(5449), 1531.

3. Christakis, G., Rinzler, S. H., Archer, M., & Kraus, A. (1966). Effect of the anti-coronary club program on coronary heart disease risk-factor status. Jama,198(6), 597-604.

IMG_1217.JPG

Cooking Fats

What’s the best way to choose fats?

Look at these three things:

1. How they are made. Choose least processed options, the unrefined or ‘virgin’ oils.

2. Fat composition, more saturated fat content means less heat damage when cooking.

3. Smoke point, how hot it gets before it smokes! But look at fat composition first.

IMG_1579-0.JPG

Try cooking with these fats instead of processed veggie and seed oils: Coconut oil, butter (or clarified butter called Ghee), and even animal fats like goose fat and lard! Yes lard…

Don’t cook with these processed oils at high heat, they are not stable. In fact, we recommend you avoid them all together. Stay away from margarines too, remember even insects won’t touch them!

Soybean oil
Canola oil
Corn oil
Safflower oil
Cottonseed oil
Sunflower oil
Rapeseed oil
Rice Bran oil
Olive oil, virgin, is still an excellent choice but for dressing hot and cold foods NOT for frying or roasting! It’s attributed to the amazing health of the Mediteranean diet. (7)

Remember, processed seed & veggie oils are snuck into a lot of foods. If you really want to avoid them, always read the label!

Reference 7
7. Kontogianni, M. D., Panagiotakos, D. B., Chrysohoou, C., Pitsavos, C., Zampelas, A., & Stefanadis, C. (2007). The impact of olive oil consumption pattern on the risk of acute coronary syndromes: the CARDIO2000 case–control study. Clinical cardiology, 30(3), 125-129.

Eat Clean. Stay Active. Feel Great

Jax

 

Heart Problems Detected Via Webcam? September 10, 2014

Filed under: Health — jax allen @ 8:35 am
Tags: ,

IMG_1563.JPG

Heart problems could soon be detected with a webcam, claim scientists… Posted Daily Mail. UK
10/9/2014

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/heart-problems-could-soon-be-detected-with-a-webcam-claim-scientists-9700468.html