Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Saturated Fat – This One’s For Rob! October 10, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 7:22 am
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Fats! Which One?

Through the 90’s the food fad was low fat, sadly even though it didn’t work as a weight loss plan, the diet industry began to produce lots of low fat foods, the rest of food manufacturers followed along.
Press releases and magazine articles based on them re-in forced the idea that at was bad.
Our NHS took evidence from studies, which were faulty, miss-interpreted and at worst, misleading.

So, Rosemary Connolly, the UK Queen of the low fat diet, jumped on board and the spiral into illness and an obese population was on it’s way. To this day many people think low fat is the best way to avoid CHD, Stroke, High Blood Pressure and elevated Cholesterol. Of course this cannot be true – as dietary fat, especially saturated fat will not always effect your cholesterol level. Just as cholesterol levels will not always lead to heart disease and stroke.

Now, times are changing. More and more people are realizing the importance of fat in the diet – good fat that is.

When adding fat into your diet plan, which you should do to maintain optimal health, you must choosing the correct sources.

Chosen unwisely, fat will not only contribute to a body weight and composition problem, but it could put your health at stake as well.

I really want to help you forget all the Lo fat nonsense of the last 30 years and re- learn what your grand parents knew – how to make meals from real food, to eat meat, dairy, fresh vegetables and enjoy very occasional sweet/fatty treats.

So, let’s talk about FATS…..

Fish Oil – The King Of Fats

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If there’s one type of dietary fat that you definitely want to be taking in, omega fatty acids are it. Omega fats, which are commonly found in fatty sources of fish (such as salmon and sardines), walnuts, and flaxseeds (along with fish oil supplements), are going to ensure that your body grows and develops as it should be.

These fats are considered essential because your body will not produce them on its own so without an intake through the diet, you’re going to be falling short.

Furthermore, omega-3 fatty acids can help to prevent a number of different diseases including arthritis, heart disease and some forms of cancer all while helping to keep your cholesterol level in check.

Omega fats, in a ratio of 1:1 Omega3 to Omega 6, can also boost your level of insulin sensitivity, which will go a long way towards encouraging a leaner overall body composition.

You should avoid adding Omega 6 as they are linked to increased inflammation.

Olive Oil – A Secret Of The Mediterranean Diet

If you’ve ever heard of the Mediterranean diet approach before, you know that at the heart of it is olive oil. People of this area consume diets that are very rich on olive oil and suffer some of the lowest rates of health issues worldwide.

Olive oil is known as an unsaturated fat and will not only prevent heart disease, but also help to keep cholesterol levels in a healthy range and ward off cancer.

It’s essential that you don’t heat olive oil over its smoke point (around 210C) however, as this can cause it to break down and produce free radicals that will then damage your health.

I like to use Olive Oil as a dressing to already cooked food – that way you get the goodness, the flavour and no nasties.

Coconut Oil – The Hidden Healthy Fat

Another fat that must be mentioned is coconut oil. Most people would recognize this as an unhealthy fat as it’s considered to be of the saturated variety. But don’t be fooled, coconut oil is actually a very healthy and is considered a medium chain fatty acid. These fatty acids react differently in the body than most and can actually be broken down and used as a fuel source immediately rather than being stored directly as body fat tissue like longer chain fatty acids are, which are found in plant based oils. ( avoid ALL plant based fats- margarine, cooking oils etc).

Adding coconut oil to your daily diet can help to increase your metabolic rate and promote faster overall weight loss, so if you’re serious about getting lean, get some and use it.
It also has anti-fungal properties, can help to enhance your energy level and endurance, and also offers antioxidant support.

I cook with coconut oil all the time as it can be heated to high temperatures without harming the oil. You cab even buy oil that’s has no coconut flavour; however I find when cooking meats the coconut flavour can be a great addition.

It makes a great moisturiser too – visit your local West Indian or Asian store for great bargain prices compared to Supermarkets.

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Canola Oil – The Fat On Your Banned List

Finally, to finish off our discussion of fats, we must make note of one that you should be avoiding at all costs – canola oil. The issue with canola oil is that it’s heavily processed and contains trans fatty acids, which are extremely detrimental to your health and well-being.

The body has absolutely no requirement for these trans fats and you should eliminate them from your diet altogether.

In addition to this, canola oil is very unstable when under heat, light, and pressure, and can cause oxidization to take place, creating free radicals in the body. This then puts you at risk for a wide number of diseases including cancer, heart disease, and may also lead to a greater likelihood of weight gain.

So, I’d like you to check your pantry – remove all vegetable oils and spreads, margarine and low fat sprays. Then replace them with olive oil for dressings, coconut oil for cooking and real – grass fed- butter for everything else!

Eat Better – Feel Better

Jax

NOTE : many studies show that supplementing with 5 or more grams of fish oil (Omega3) – NOT cod liver oil will help you drop body fat and gain many health benefits – try it for 2 weeks and notice the changes in your skin, digestion, mood, joints and mental acuity. ! J

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Stay Active – Age Well October 9, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Fun,Health — jax allen @ 7:33 am
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Stay Active – Age Well
Older people are challenging the stereotypical image of pensioners, says Dr Cassandra Phoenix.

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1 in 6 Over 60
We live in a society that is undergoing a dramatic demographic change. As 11 million post-war baby boomers march towards retirement, more than one in six people in the UK are aged over 65. In less than 30 years it will be one in four.

Combined with changes in social convention, such as smaller families and couples having children later in life, we’re experiencing a significant shift in the makeup of our communities.

Inactive Lifestyles Detrimental
Like much of the population, older adults often live inactive lifestyles and this can have a detrimental effect on their health and wellbeing. Add to this a swathe of negative stereotypes about what can and can’t be done in older age – and the use of words like ‘burden’ and ‘care crisis’ – and older people could be forgiven for thinking they’ve already been condemned to the scrap heap.

As we increasingly see growing older as something to fear rather than embrace, we’re confronted with a period in our lives that’s stigmatised as a time to shut down. Commonly perceived as relics of a bygone age, older people are often viewed as being immobilised by frailty – out of touch and all too often, out of sight.

Outdated Stereotypes
Yet the stories and experiences of many older people do not conform to these antiquated and outmoded stereotypes. They view retirement as an opportunity to explore new hobbies, activities and relationships, and could offer the key to helping us all age in a positive and active way.

Over the last two years our research team, based at the University of Exeter Medical School, has followed a group of active older adults as part of the Moving Stories project. We’ve talked to them about their pastimes, sports and hobbies, taken photos of them in action, and asked others what they think about their lifestyles and stories.

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We’re hoping that by listening to their accounts of ‘moving’, we can understand how and why they’ve been able to deal with the challenges of growing older and being active that everyone faces. We also want to know what role all types of physical activity, rather than just exercise, can play in ageing well.

An incredibly broad range of people from across Cornwall signed up to take part and share their stories with us – from sea swimmers, dancers and golfers, to cyclists, walkers, bowls and badminton players. Our participants ranged in age from a positively youthful 60 to a spritely 92 and continuously conveyed their enthusiasm and desire to remain fit and active.

We’re still analysing the huge amounts of data we’ve captured, but one theme has already emerged across the majority of people we spoke to and that’s the experience of pleasure.

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The importance of pleasure is under-researched in health-related areas, particularly in relation to physical activity in older age. Pleasure can take many forms but in this context we’re talking about feelings that make a person feel good, including happiness, joy, fun, and tranquillity.

Many of our participants described so-called ‘sensual’ pleasures – such as the feeling of the wind in their hair when walking outdoors, and the gliding and floating sensations of swimming through the ocean or a pool. These types of experiences show signs of the human senses connecting people with their environment and providing feelings that help contribute to happiness and wellbeing.

We found that people also drew pleasure from documenting their experiences. Whether it was through keeping a diary or writing articles for community magazines, our participants felt a sense of pleasure long after the activity had taken place. So it looks as though it’s not just the activity that can give pleasure, but what happens before and after. We think this might be an important mechanism for expanding the appeal of taking part in some form of activity.

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Get Into An Active Routine
Perhaps somewhat unexpectedly, the active older people in our study also described the pleasure they derived from simply having a routine.

The habitual nature of some of their activities gave them a structure that, in the absence of work, was very welcome.

The experience of pleasure seems like an important factor in how and why people stay active. It’s gives us an important insight into how we measure the impact of physical activity, showing being active is about much more than meeting recommended guidelines and preventing illness.

Through the help of our participants, we’re starting to uncover the other ways in which physical activity might enable us to ‘move’ through life ( later life in particular) in a positive, pleasurable way. We’re hoping our findings will influence the way that people are empowered to stay active. We’re working with AgeUK and Cornwall Sports Partnership to help this happen.

We’ve teamed up with TheatreScience to bring this project to life on stage. The play Moving Stories – Moving On has been inspired by interviews with our participants.

The opening performance is free and takes place in Truro on October 2. More information visit http://www.ecehh.org/events/moving-stories-theatre.

Dr Cassandra Phoenix is a researcher at the University of Exeter Medical School.

Read more: http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/Stay-active-grow-older-s-recipe-ageing/story-23025927-detail/story.html#ixzz3Fd7VVVBo
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Read more at http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/Stay-active-grow-older-s-recipe-ageing/story-23025927-detail/story.html#F9di2dvIcWrpL7Xs.99

 

10 Tips To Prevent Falls October 2, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 4:45 pm
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I found this article on Huffington Post

It is based on our American cousins – but it works here too!

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They suggest calling a friend if you feel lonely or isolated – I’d say find a Seniors exercise group and go often!

Article: http://huff.to/1rlSRZu

Move Strong: 10 Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Falls
Celeste Carlucci 09/23/14 12:19 PM ET

1. Never put your underpants on standing up. It might sound like a no-brainer, but I can’t tell you how many older adults still take the chance of putting on their pants or underpants without stabilizing themselves by holding onto something or sitting.

2. Step on the leash to pick up the poo. Don’t risk Fido getting frisky, pulling you off balance, and sending you flying! Keep your dog close, take firm hold of the leash, then step on it while you bend down to clean up after your dog.

3. Be warned. If you think “This is unsafe — but I’ll take care of it later,” don’t wait! Often you’re not hurt “by accident,” but “by lack of action.” If I had a nickel for every time I’ve heard “I knew I should have closed the dishwasher door; picked up the magazines off the floor; tucked away that loose computer cable before leaving the room to answer the phone, the doorbell, to go to the bathroom, check emails, take a nap,” etc. Eliminate a problem when you first see it.

4. Hold the staircase railing whether you think you need to or not. Same rule applies to escalators. You never know when someone behind or ahead of you might lose his or her balance and come tumbling down. Your falls won’t always be your fault, so be alert to your environment and be cautious.

5. Gents, if you must reach in your back pocket for your wallet, and Ladies, if you need to dig into your purse — especially if your balance is a bit shaky — first, stop what you’re doing (walking, chatting with a friend, talking on your cell phone). Pause. Now proceed to look for the big bucks.

6. Don’t even think you can step over that low hedge or fence, box in the supermarket aisle, or low-hanging rope divider. Yes, people do this! And maybe when you were 20 and in a hurry you could, too. But at this age, don’t take that risk. It isn’t worth it.

7. As soon as you get the walk sign, go! If the sign has started blinking, it’s too late. Set out right away, so you never have to rush.

8. Don’t run to catch the bus, catch your grandchild, or catch your dog. I’ve seen some of the fittest older adults suffer terrible accidents trying to run across the street, play Frisbee with their dog, or play hide-and-seek with their grandkids on snow and ice.

9. Be aware of stepladders. There it is, in that high cupboard: your favorite serving platter or baking dish. If you can’t store it in a lower cupboard, then proceed with caution. Never take both hands off the ladder — especially to change an overhead light bulb. Just say no. Invite a friend to help you. A free tip from a class participant who fell off her stepladder: If you live alone, wear a medical alert device. Seriously injured, she lay several hours on the floor before someone found her.

10. When you’re feeling blue, call a friend. Being alone and isolated can increase your risk for a fall. When you remove yourself socially, stay at home more and more, your activity level drops dramatically, which leads to weaker muscles and depression. Get out with a friend and enjoy a cup of coffee together, or even better, sign up to take an exercise class together.

Remember, change begins with you. Take prevention seriously.

We all need to do the things that help us, help our family and friends move strong and reduce the risk for falls.

Be Active. Feel Better

Jax

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