Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Grains Bad for Your Brain! November 28, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:30 am
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Loaf Lie #4: “If Wheat Doesn’t Cause You Digestive Distress, then it’s Safe to Eat”

When some people eat the tiniest bit of wheat or gluten, they can be doubled over in pain or running to the bathroom within minutes.

In a way, these people have an advantage… at least they can identify the problem and its source.

But just because you feel fine after eating a bagel, doesn’t mean it is not damaging your body.

What You Don’t Know (or Notice) Can Still Hurt You…
Studies show that even if you are NOT “gluten intolerant” these foods can cause inflammation and perforations in the gut – allowing unwanted substances to “leak” into your bloodstream.

And you might not feel the slightest gurgle in your belly. In fact, almost 50% of newly diagnosed celiac patients have no noticeable abdominal distress.

Yet, with each bite you are causing damage to nearly every tissue, system and organ in your body.

Here are just a few of the symptoms this can cause:

Headaches and fatigue
Chronic sinus issues and lowered immunity
Arthritis, bone and joint pain
Nutrient deficiencies, and
A VERY long list of skin conditions, including everything from acne to wrinkles.
More troubling is that…

This Can Set the Stage for an Astonishing Variety of Diseases
Research shows that wheat can trigger a variety of autoimmune conditions (where the body attacks itself), including: type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.

It can also cause chronic disease…

The Journal of the American Medical Association published a report showing that gluten sensitive people who still consume grains increase their risk of death up to 75%!

The New England Journal of Medicine lists 55 conditions that can be caused by eating gluten, including:

Cancer
Heart Disease
Osteoporosis
Irritable Bowel Disease
Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue
Thyroid disorders
Anemia
Epilepsy
Canker Sores
Lupus

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And it doesn’t just affect your body…

Bread Madness:

Don’t Destroy Your Brain with Grain
More than 50 years ago, doctors discovered that some mental patients made spontaneous recoveries when bread was not available to them.

The term “bread madness” was even coined to describe schizophrenia.

Recently, doctors at Duke University reported on a woman who had a 50-year history of delusions, hallucinations and suicide attempts. Within a week of stopping wheat, her symptoms disappeared!

Now, I’m sure you’re perfectly sane…

But if you (or someone you know) has ever suffered from depression… insomnia… anxiety… dementia… or nearly any other psychiatric or neurological condition – there’s a good chance a grain-free diet would help.

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax

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Metabolic Syndrome: Could You Have It? November 26, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — jax allen @ 8:39 am

Metabolic Syndrome: Could You Have It?

Millions of Americans have a health condition that could increase their risk of developing 10 other serious medical problems, and they don’t even know it. The condition is called metabolic syndrome (also known as syndrome X or insulin resistance syndrome), and it may affect as many as 47 million Americans.

The list of health problems that metabolic syndrome can lead to is long and concerning. It doubles a person’s risk of both heart attack and stroke and also may lead to cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), fatty liver disease, cholesterol gallstones, asthma, and even some forms of cancer.

But here’s the good news: Adding a brisk walk to your routine every day may be enough to help stop this syndrome — and all of the accompanying health ills — in its tracks.

Do You Have It?
Unfortunately, most of the symptoms of metabolic syndrome operate silently and are hardly noticeable from the outside. Finding out if you have the syndrome requires knowing several health measures obtained only through medical testing. Ask yourself the following questions to help determine whether a doctor’s visit is in order:

Are you overweight?
Do you carry excess weight around your middle?
Do you exercise infrequently and eat mostly unhealthful foods?
Are you over age 60?
Does someone in your family have diabetes?
Do you have high blood pressure?
Do you have heart disease?
Are you African American or Mexican American?
Answering yes to any of the above questions means that you have at least one personal factor that may be cause for concern.

A Cluster of 5 Factors
Obtaining the following five health measures will help you and your doctor determine if you have metabolic syndrome. When grouped together, these five factors indicate the condition is present.

Abdominal obesity is the most obvious mark of metabolic syndrome. Obesity in general has been linked to metabolic syndrome, but the amount of fat around the waistline correlates even more closely. For men, a waistline of 40 inches or more is considered high risk. For women, a waistline of 35 inches or more is high risk.
Elevated blood pressure is another characteristic of metabolic syndrome. Anything above about 130/85 mm Hg may be a risk factor.
High blood triglycerides also put you at risk. Anything just above the normal, healthy level (150 mg/dL) is a marker of metabolic syndrome.
Low HDL (good) cholesterol is an important factor in diagnosing metabolic syndrome. For men, low HDL is below 40 mg/dL. For women, low HDL is below 50 mg/dL.
Insulin resistance is the defining risk factor for metabolic syndrome. If your body is not able to process blood sugar efficiently, or if your fasting blood glucose level is at or above 110 mg/dL, then it is likely that you have insulin resistance.
Having three of these five characteristics can indicate the presence of metabolic syndrome. But only a doctor can make this determination, so if you feel you are at risk, make an appointment with your healthcare professional today. An early diagnosis may help prevent the serious health problems associated with metabolic syndrome.

If you do have the syndrome, your doctor can also introduce you to immediate lifestyle changes that will help to put an end to this dangerous and life-threatening condition.

Walk Off the Weight
Reversing metabolic syndrome may be as straightforward as exercising more and losing extra weight. Weight loss can have a beneficial effect on all characteristics of metabolic syndrome, from your blood fat levels to your body’s resistance to insulin. An exercise program — something as simple as walking a couple of miles each day — may be enough to help you lose weight and start reversing the metabolic syndrome trend.

Watch What You Eat
You can also make basic changes in your diet that will help. For example, by switching to healthy polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats such as canola, olive, and peanut oils, you may reduce your body’s LDL(“bad” cholesterol) levels and increase HDL (“good” cholesterol) levels. Poly- and monounsaturated fats are also found in certain foods, such as nuts and avocados. If you need help managing your diet and cutting back on unhealthy foods, a nutrition therapist can set you up with a healthful eating plan that works for you.

Maybe Medication
In addition to lifestyle changes, medication therapies may be useful. Two promising types of drugs for treating metabolic syndrome are insulin sensitizers, such as thiazolidinediones, and metformin. However, no trials have been done to test their effectiveness in preventing cardiovascular disease in people with metabolic syndrome. Medication may also help to treat some of the factors, such as high blood pressure, involved in this syndrome.

Take Action to Avoid the Syndrome

It’s not clear what causes metabolic syndrome. Some people may be genetically predisposed to it, while others may have a combination of lifestyle and medical factors that put them at risk. But metabolic syndrome is preventable. By getting plenty of exercise and maintaining a healthy weight, there is a strong possibility that you can avoid this condition. Knowing the consequences of metabolic syndrome might be just the motivation you need to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Interesting?

Do something EVERYDAY to change your risk factors…

Jax

 

Popular Diets Achieve Only Modest Long Term Weight loss! November 24, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:00 am
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Found this article in Forbes Magazine. It gives a balanced overview of the popular fad diets and the eating trends that appear to have a healthy effect.

Popular Diets Achieve Only Modest Long-Term Weight Loss

Four of the most popular current weight loss diets produce at best only modest long-term benefits, a new study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes shows. The study also found few significant differences across the four diets, offering little hope that any one diet can produce a serious dent in the obesity epidemic.

Mark Eisenberg and colleagues systematically searched the literature for studies evaluating the effects of the Atkins, South Beach, Zone, and Weight Watchers diets. They identified 12 randomized, controlled studies with follow-up of at least 1 year. Ten studies compared one of the diets with usual care. In these trials, Weight Watchers was the only diet to consistently outperform usual care in achieving weight loss, but this difference was modest at best, yielding a 1-year weight loss range of 3.5 to 6 kg with Weight Watchers compared with 0.8 to 5.4 kg with usual care. In the two head-to-head trials, Atkins and Zone resulted in a similar but modest weight loss. Longer-term data out to 2 years — available only for the Weight Watchers and Atkins diets– showed that some of the original weight loss was regained over time. Only one small trial studied the South Beach diet.

Some of the studies also looked at the effect of the diets on cardiovascular risk factors like cholesterol and blood pressure. Consistent with the weight loss findings, there were no large differences across the diets, and the impact of the diets on these risk factors was modest at best.

The authors note that the effects of these diets in real life may be even worse than in the “ideal conditions” of randomized, controlled trials. Observational studies suggest that the effect may be even smaller in real life and that the weight loss seen in the trials “overestimates that achieved by patients seen as part of everyday clinical practice.”

The findings also appear to be consistent with a previous study that looked at earlier popular diets, including Jenny Craig, LA Weight Loss, and again, Weight Watchers. The authors of the earlier study concluded that “with the exception of 1 trial of Weight Watchers, the evidence to support the use of major commercial and self-help weight loss programs is suboptimal.”

“Despite their popularity and important contributions to the multi-million dollar weight loss industry, we still do not know if these diets are effective to help people lose weight and decrease their risk factors for heart disease,” said Eisenberg, in a press release. “With such a small number of trials looking at each diet and their somewhat conflicting results, there is only modest evidence that using these diets is beneficial in the long-term.”

In an accompanying editorial, David Katz writes that one limitation of the study is the narrow range of diets examined by the authors, since three of them represent variations on the low-carbohydrate theme. Missing from the analysis is “the full expanse of competing dietary claims,” including ”low fat as well as low carbohydrate diets; vegan and vegetarian diets; low glycemic diets; Paleo diets; Mediterranean diets and diets incubated at the National Institutes of Health.”

But Katz argues passionately that the focus on individual diets or specific macronutrients is misguided and unhelpful. He proposes a simple formula — “wholesome foods in sensible combinations”– and states that traditional diets, despite superficial differences, “are more alike than different.” Blue Zone populations — a term for the world’s healthiest and longest-lived people — “range from vegans in California, to the quintessentially Mediterranean dieters of Crete, to the traditional Asian dieters of Okinawa,” writes Katz. “The diets all emphasize foods direct from nature, a variety of plants, and none of the hyper-­processed, willfully unsatiating junk that makes up so much of the typical American diet. They are all nutrient rich, high in fiber, and low glycemic. But they are not uniformly low or high in any given macronutrient. The emphasis is consistently on wholesome foods in sensible, time-­honored combinations — and the macronutrients fall within broad ranges.”

Eat Clean. Eat Simple. Stay Active

 

Gluten Problem or Wheat Problem? November 21, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:00 am
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Loaf Lie #3: “If You Don’t Have a Problem with Gluten, You Don’t Have a Problem with Wheat”

Most people are aware that a little protein in wheat can cause BIG problems for some people.

For those with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity (two completely different conditions), even a small amount of gluten can cause serious digestive problems… systemic inflammation… autoimmune disease… and the list goes on.

At least 300 health-related issues have been linked to gluten.

But here’s the thing…

Gluten is a REAL Problem…
But the Problem is NOT Just Gluten!

Most doctors (mistakenly) believe that any problems with wheat are problems with gluten. In other words, if you don’t have a problem with gluten… you don’t have a problem.

However, the protein we call “gluten” actually consists of hundreds of smaller compounds. Any ONE of these could trigger an inflammatory or immune response.

And that’s not even a fraction of the whole story, because…

According to a study published in Plant Physiology, modern wheat is capable of producing at least 23,788 unique proteins!

This would explain the studies where people have shown a severe reaction to wheat – and no reaction at all to gluten itself, even in high doses.

The problem is that conventional lab testing looks for just two antibodies related to gluten.

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If you test negative for these two, most doctors will give you a clean bill of health – and probably tell you that any symptoms you’re experiencing are “all in your head.”

But science has found numerous compounds in grains – besides gluten – which can cause serious long-term health issues…

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The Powerful Chemical in Wheat That Protects it from Being Eaten

Unlike animals, plants cannot escape being eaten. That’s why many plants have defenses to discourage predation. Thorns on a cactus are an obvious example.

But wheat and grains have defenses too, including compounds which can deprive you of vital nutrients and slowly leak out toxic effects. (This is called a HINT!)

One of these is wheat germ agglutinin (WGA).

Studies show that WGA can have direct toxic effects on most tissues in your body, including the heart and brain.In fact, it enters the brain so easily that scientists are hopeful it can be used to deliver Alzheimer’s drugs.

Like gluten, WGA can also disrupt your hormonal system, weaken immunity, cause digestive problems and promote systemic inflammation (the cornerstone of degenerative disease).

And the highest concentrations of it are found in whole grains – including supposedly “healthy” sprouted grains!

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax

 

Menopause Monday November 17, 2014

6 Tips For Weight Loss At Menopause

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Menopause and weight gain seem to go together for the majority of women, even those who have always been slim. Your hormones are one factor, but here are some useful tips to help lose those pounds.
October 24, 2014
From Wellsprings
http://anna.blog.wellsprings-health.com

Most women notice that along with menopause comes some unwanted weight, particularly on the stomach, hips and thighs. Unfortunately this is Nature’s way of making sure that your declining oestrogen levels are getting topped up by switching production to the fat cells.
No matter how much you exercise, or how healthily you eat, it is very hard to avoid putting on those extra pounds but there are some simple ways to manage your weight at menopause.

Hormone Balance
1. Get oestrogen dominance under control as oestrogen is produced in the fat cells you want to make sure that it is not being produced in excess. Rebalancing with bioidentical natural progesterone will help keep it under control, and as progesterone is also a diuretic that can help with that bloated stomach too.
Useful article:
http://www.bio-hormone-health.com/2014/08/06/what-is-oestrogen-dominance/


Sleep

2. Make sure you’re getting enough sleep because you burn calories when you sleep, so the less of it you get the more calories get stored in your body. Also, when tired we tend to go for a ‘quick fix’ of something comforting which is usually carbohydrate, fat and sugar none of which help lose us weight. These foods are high in calories but they affect your bloods sugar levels and then can leave you feeling tired, irritable, anxious and reaching for the next fix.
Useful article:
http://www.bio-hormone-health.com/2014/07/02/5-ways-to-improve-your-sleep/

Control Your Blood Sugar
3. Some will find eating little and often as your body can cope better with several small meals throughout the day, not a couple of large ones. This is the best way of keeping your blood sugar levels stable and studies show that people who eat 4-5 meals or snacks a day are better able to control their appetite and weight. Stick to a Mediterranean style diet for healthy weight loss with fresh wholefoods, vegetables, fruit, salads, nuts, and seeds.
Useful article:
http://www.bio-hormone-health.com/2014/01/27/the-dash-diet-is-no-1-for-weight-loss/

Hydration
4. Drink plenty of water as often, though you think you are hungry, you might actually just be thirsty because the majority of us simply do not drink enough water. Your body needs fluid to perform many of its functions, but strangely enough if you drink too little you can actually end up with fluid retention as your body is holding on to whatever it can get to work efficiently. Your body does not need fluids that actually make it work harder, such as fizzy sugar laden drinks and alcohol, so stick to plain water wherever you can.

Alcohol
5. Reduce your alcohol intake as it can be a major obstacle when trying to lose weight. Although there are certain drinks, such as red wine, that have been some health benefits generally it is a good idea to really cut down. The problem is that alcohol upsets blood sugar levels, depletes nutrients, causes liver problems, aggravates the gut, lowers immunity and, if you’re trying to lose weight, it is not good news as it increases hunger and cravings for junk foods. We also know that your liver cannot metabolise fat while it deals with toxins like alcohol.

Get Your HEC in check ( Hinger. Energy. Cravings)
6. Understanding why you eat is crucial, as menopause certainly can be an absolute rollercoaster in terms of your emotions. If it is emotion, rather than physical hunger, that triggers your eating then it will really help you to tackle this in order to lose weight. The simplest method is to keep a food diary; noting down what you eat and why you are are eating it, for instance are you angry, sad, upset? You may find it simpler to talk this through with someone like a counsellor or a therapist who specialises in this area.

Eat Clean Train Smart. Feel Great

Jax

 

Are 3 Daily Meals So Bad? November 15, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:30 am
Tags: , , ,

“Eat Small Meals Frequently To Keep Your Metabolism Boosted”

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Have you been told to eat lots of smaller meals every few hours in order to “keep your metabolism boosted”? This advice is often practically useless unless you’re a 250-pound bodybuilder with mammoth amounts of muscle that demand constant energy.

Yes, eating gives your metabolism a mini boost while you’re digesting the food, but it’s the total amount of food on your plate that determines how much you boost your metabolism, NOT the number of meals.

Controlled studies have put this theory to the test and it’s been refuted over and over. The results showed that there is no difference in a metabolism boost when you compare a group who eats many small meals to a group which consumed fewer larger meals. 6 7 Another interesting study on obese men revealed that eating 6 meals per day led to less feelings of fullness compared to 3 meals. 8

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Feel Great

Jax.

Scientific References
6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9155494
7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19943985
8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20339363

 

Poisoned By Bread? November 14, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:30 am
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Loaf Lie #2: “Gluten-Free Bread is Healthier than Bread Made from Wheat”

If you’ve already given up traditional grain-based foods, you’ve made a wise decision!

But if you replaced these foods with their commercial gluten-free counterparts, reconsider.

You see, most gluten-free breads, cereals, pastas, crackers and cookies use ingredients that are not much better (and in some cases, worse) than those made with wheat!

Like any processed junk food, these products usually contain chemical preservatives, soy protein, dough conditioners, industrial seed oils, corn and rice syrup… and often, GMOs.

And that’s not all, because…

The Ingredients in Most Gluten-Free Products Will Also Send Your Blood Sugar Soaring!
In place of wheat flour, most gluten-free products – and many online recipes for that matter – use flours with glycemic values that are off the charts, including:

Corn Starch
Rice Flour
Potato Starch
Tapioca Starch
Sorghum flour
Millet
Here’s what Dr. William Davis, author of Wheat Belly, has to say about these unhealthy alternatives…

“These powdered starches are among the few foods that increase blood sugar higher than even whole wheat. It means these foods trigger weight gain in the abdomen, increased blood sugars, insulin resistance, diabetes, cataracts, and arthritis. They are NOT healthy replacements for wheat.”

Take a look at how some common gluten-free foods impact your blood sugar…

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It should come as no surprise that…

Most people GAIN WEIGHT on a gluten-free diet.
In fact, one study showed that 81% of people who adopted a gluten-free diet had gained weight after two years!

You should also know that…

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Some Gluten-Free Products Contain 90 Times More Arsenic Than the EPA Allows for Drinking Water!

Of course, you know that arsenic is a deadly poison…

But you might not know that many gluten free baked goods contain potentially toxic levels of it!

The problem comes mostly from brown rice flour and brown rice syrup, often major ingredients in gluten-free baking mixes, breads, crackers, chips and pasta.

In fact, analysis conducted by Consumer Reports showed that some popular gluten-free products contain up to 90 times the arsenic allowed in drinking water!

Of course, the same risk applies if you’re using brown rice products in your recipes at home.

Chronic arsenic exposure – even at very low levels – can lead to headaches, fatigue, brain fog and digestive issues… not to mention heart disease, cancer, respiratory illness and diabetes.

Keep this in mind the next time you hear that “gluten-free bread is healthier than bread made with wheat.”

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax.