Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Study – exercise Means Better Memory November 30, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 11:00 pm
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Another study shows exercise means better memory for senior citizens



Many studies find fitness equals better mental ability – this one links it mostly to long-term memory

By Tucker Sutherland, editor, SeniorJournal.com

Nov. 24, 2015 – A new study released today declares that older adults who take more steps than most by walking or jogging performed better on memory tasks. Really, how could this be news? It is just another way of looking at physical fitness and how it enhances memory and cognitive ability. But, this one does find a new twist.

 As the editor of SeniorJournal.com for 16 years I have reported on dozens of studies that have come up with the same result – physical fitness, which can be obtained in many ways, helps people stay mentally fit as they age.

I’m not complaining but I am declaring this is an established reality – exercise equals better mental performance as people age. 

This research started with the question, “Could staying physically active improve quality of life by delaying cognitive decline and prolonging an independent lifestyle?”

 

“Absolutely,” is the answer I could have provided before their study. It has been proven in dozens of studies – maybe hundreds – that primarily have varied only by the technique used to gain the physical fitness – running, walking, swimming, weight-lifting, dancing, hula hoop, etc.





The differences in this study is it looked at groups of both young and old adults. Which leadsthem to look at long-term versus short-term memory.

The report appears online in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.

The study included 29 young adults (ages 18-31) and 31 older adults (ages 55-82) who wore a small device called an ActiGraph, which recorded information including how many steps each took, how vigorous the steps were and how much time it involved. These are used in many, many studies of physical exercise.

Participants also completed neuropsychological testing to assess their memory, planning and problem-solving abilities. 

In addition to standardized neuropsychological tasks of executive function (planning and organization abilities) and long-term memory, participants engaged in a laboratory task in which they had to learn face-name associations. 

The researchers found that older adults who took more steps per day had better memory performance. 

And, what will appeal to many elderly, the association between the number of steps taken was strongest with a task that required recalling which name went with a person’s face – the same type of everyday task that older adults often have difficulty with. 

In young adults, the number of steps taken was not associated with memory performance.

It is long-term memory that is improved by activity

This lead them to the conclusion that the effects of physical activity extend to long-term memory – the same type of memory that is negatively impacted by aging and neurodegenerative dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease. 

”Our findings that physical activity is positively associated with memory is appealing for a variety of reasons. Everyone knows that physical activity is a critical component to ward off obesity and cardiovascular-related disease. Knowing that a lack of physical activity may negatively impact one’s memory abilities will be an additional piece of information to motivate folks to stay more active,” explained corresponding author Scott Hayes, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine and the Associate Director of the Neuroimaging Research for Veterans Center at the VA Boston Healthcare System.

The authors point out that staying physically active can take a variety of forms from formal exercise programs to small changes, such as walking or taking the stairs. 

“More research is needed to explore the specific mechanisms of how physical activity may positively impact brain structure and function as well as to clarify the impact of specific exercise programs (e.g., strength, aerobic, or combined training) or dose of exercise (frequency, intensity, duration) on a range of cognitive functions,” added Hayes.

The authors say that the objective measurement of physical activity was a key component of their study, because the majority of studies to date have used self-report questionnaires, which can be impacted by memory failures or biases.

This work was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation Research & Development Service and Clinical Science Research & Development Service [MV]. Assistance with participant recruitment was provided by the Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (P50-AG005134) and Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Center (P30-AG13846).



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Armchair Athlete? November 12, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:35 am
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 Adapted from an article ….

Sports Performance Bulletin

Issue No. 225, November 9, 2015

  
This article is very interesting…. I know what he means. I’ve been teaching multiple fitness classes most days since 1983, some days it feels like 1883! 

Maintaining muscle mass, good quality sleep and eating protein IS key! 

Tips for the Ageing (armchair) Athlete 

From

David Joyce

Editor, Sports Performance Bulletin

Tips for the ageing athlete 

  
One of the reasons I love working in sport is that you are constantly surrounded by young people and their questionable fashion, language and music! I firmly believe that you’re only as old as you want to be, and that there’s a marked difference between being aged and being old.
Age is something that happens due to the inexorable passing of time, and there are certain strategies that we can implement to ensure that we lessen the decay that Father Time wants to impart.
Firstly, a decline in muscle power doesn’t just creep up. It hits you square in the face. A fall that leads to a fractured hip is one of the biggest causes of so-called age-related hospital admissions in the Western World. We know, that a huge part of this stems back to poor muscle strength and power.
So, is there anything we can do about this? Of course there is! 
You are never too old to lift heavy things! Sure, there may be a decline in what you can lift when you’re 80 compared to when you’re 35, but there is stacks of scientific research that has been done that demonstrates that even 90 year-olds can gain both muscle size and strength following a targeted strength programme. 
The most effective exercises are the ones that you do, so, in other words, any exercise that has an overload demand attached to it will develop strength. Should we teach a 60 year old to power clean if they’ve never done it before? Possibly not, because this complex lift is as much about skill as it is about strength, but if the 60 year old is well trained in its technique, there’s no reason why they shouldn’t continue to lift in this manner. 
Often, the time it takes to recover following a strength session is longer as we get older. This needs to be taken into account when planning training, in particular taking care to space out plyometric work, even for the masters athlete that is well attuned to this activity. 
In terms of nutrition, there is now plenty of evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of a diet high in protein being especially important for the mature athlete, to counteract the sarcopaenia (muscle fibre loss) that coincides with increasing number of candles on the birthday cake.

Interesting…. I know what he means. I’ve been teaching multiple fitness classes most days since 1983, some days it feels like 1883! 

Maintaining muscle mass, good quality sleep and eating protein IS key! 

Jax  

 

Hydration -The Number One! September 28, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 1:09 pm
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Avoid Hospital!! May 2, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 7:16 am
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Download the 5 Ways Guide to Prevent Senior Hospitalizations

 

This article is very interesting, especially if you care for a senior at home. 
A simple checklist to remind you to notice warning signs. 
I love the points about staying active – just walking to visit a friend every day and eating a varied diet will have a massive effect on wellness and independent living. 
Follow the link to download the article. 
Jax. 
 

Top Tips For Ageing Well April 29, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 7:21 pm
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An Australian article – a good read…

News we’re living longer is heartening to many of us. But the idea our extra years might not all be healthy is a sobering reality.

Heart diseasecancertype 2 diabetesosteoarthritisosteoporosis, and cognitive problems are all more common as we get older and the increased risk often starts in mid life or earlier.

The great news is there’s much you can do to enhance your complete physical, mental and social wellbeing in later life, says the University of Melbourne’s Associate Professor Briony Dow, who is also director of health promotion for the National Ageing Research Institute.

“You’re ageing from the moment you’re born really,” Dow says. “Ageing healthily is not different from healthy living I guess. It’s just we’ve looked at it from the perspective of older people.”

Making certain lifestyle choices can reduce your chance of needing residential care or going to hospital. It can also help you feel safe and secure and ensure you are an active participant in life, rather than an observer on the side lines. To the extent you can control your destiny, “you’re wise if you do,” she says.

Here are Professor Dow’s top tips to maximise your chances of ageing well.

1. Keep physically active

This means aiming for at least a good half hour to an hour of moderate intensity physical activity every day, where you’re working hard enough to get a bit puffed but you can still talk. (Australian exercise guidelines also state you can settle for clocking up roughly half that amount of activity if you exercise more vigorously, where you are so puffed you can barely talk.)

This reduces your risk of a wide range of diseases but especially heart disease, our biggest killer. It can also help mental health problems like anxiety and depression.

It doesn’t have to be formal exercise: gardening, housework or walking to the shops all count. Some stretching exercises or yoga are also important for flexibility “so you can keep doing what you want to do,” Dow says. And it’s good to include some strength training, such as exercising with weights to help control weight and keep your bones strong.

“Physical activity is the most important thing, although it’s a toss up between that and giving up smoking if you’re a smoker.”

2. Don’t smoke

“If you’re a smoker, you need to stop smoking and the message is it’s never too late to do it,” Dow says.

“If you give up smoking in middle age, you’ll improve your life expectancy by 10 years. Or another way to put that is your life expectancy is reduced by 10 years if you keep smoking. But it’s not just about life expectancy. Smoking is a risk factor for all the chronic diseases, including the ones that affect your brain [Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia].”

3. Be socially active

“This is really important for both your physical health and mental health,” says Dow. “If you’re socially isolated, it’s equivalent to smoking 15 cigarettes a day.”

Some evidence suggests loneliness can increase your risk of premature death by as much as 30 per cent.

It may be that increased stress hormones increase the risk of heart disease, but social activity is also likely to be a form of mental stimulation that’s good for ageing brains.

Says Maree Farrow, a neuroscientist and research fellow with Alzheimer’s Australia, being socially active means “you have to think about what you’re saying and understand what [someone else] is saying. You have to understand facial expressions and body language. Lots of different parts of your brain are working.”

Social isolation can happen even when other people around, Dow points out. It’s having a real sense of connect to others that’s thought to be important.

4. Eat well and limit the booze

Eating well has a significant role to play in warding off chronic diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and even some cancers.

There’s no magic food that’s going to keep your brain healthy, says Farrow but eating a varied and balanced diet that includes plenty of fruit and vegetables seem to be particularly important.

As well, limit your alcohol intake. Australia’s current drinking guidelines recommend no more than two standard drinks a day.

5. Keep your brain active

“We know from lots of research that people who do more stimulating activities throughout their life have better brain function and a lower chance of developing dementia,” says Farrow.

While there has been much emphasis on crosswords and sudoku puzzles to boost your brain, other activities you could do include taking up a second language, pursuing a course of study, reading widely or learning a musical instrument.

The research suggests it’s challenging the brain so it’s learning something new or different is what matters most.

But Dow says the publicity over the role of mental stimulation has suggested there is stronger evidence for a protective effect than there really is.

“We don’t have nearly as strong evidence as you would think from all that you read,” she says, adding that there’s more evidence exercise is important. Nonetheless, it seems to be helpful and certainly won’t hurt.

6. Have an optimistic outlook 

Are you a glass half empty or glass half full person? The evidence the latter might help you fare better as you age comes from talking to older people who feel they’re doing well and asking them what they think has helped, Dow says.

As well, research has found optimists are more willing to adapt and actively participate in seeking solutions to problems and because they feel less hopelessness, they have less stress and depression. Positive people are also more likely to engage in behaviours that keep them physically healthy like eating well and exercising.

While personality type and life experiences can influence your tendency to be optimistic, you can also take matters into your own hands. “I think you can control it to some extent,” Dow says. “I think you can manage your life so you’ve always got something that is exciting for you and can keep you upbeat.”

 

Ageing? No Way! February 5, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 5:20 pm
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Ageing? No Way!
Whats the #1 cause of weight gain, joint pain and osteoporosis in men and women over the age of 50!

And It’s totally preventable 🙂

I’m dedicating to helping you improve not only your body, but your health and quality of life, the first thing I want address is something called sarcopenia.

Sarcopenia, is a greek word that means “poverty of the flesh” and can otherwise be known as “Muscle Wasting!”

Nearly everyone over the age of 30, who doesn’t know how to fight it is currently undergoing stages of sarcopenia.

In fact, did you know that between the ages of 30 and 60 the average man or woman loses 15lbs of muscle? And…

Did you also know that 1lb of muscle can burn 30-50 calories per day?

That means by your 40’s your metabolism will drop by burning 150-250 less calories per day…

By your 50’s your metabolism will drop by 300-500 calories per day…

And… by your 60’s if you don’t do anything about this, your metabolism will have reduced by 450-750 calories per day!

Looking at this information, it’s no wonder that people gain weight year after year all while feeling hopeless!

After all, by the time you’re 60, you would have to eat 450-750 less calories then you did at 30 just to maintain your.
However, sarcopenia, muscle wasting and the sever drop in your metabolism between the ages of 30 and 60 can easily be prevented and reversed if you know the right steps to take.
So, don’t blame the passage of time for your weight gain and middle age spread!
Stay active, Eat Clean and Feel Great

Jax

 

Menopause and Belly Fat November 4, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 2:06 pm
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Menopause Weight Gain & Belly Fat

Menopausal belly fat is extremely common. As women age, they find that weight gain becomes harder to avoid and their hips and waist will begin to expand and merge.
Menopausal belly fat can be upsetting for women who find themselves obsessing over their ‘muffin tops’. Furthermore, this menopause symptom can be dangerous for a woman’s health and does not have to be accepted with blind resignation.

‘Middle Age Spread’ common NOT Normal!

There are actions that women can take to combat their belly fat.

Why Should I Worry about My Menopausal Stomach Weight Gain?

Some women may look at their menopausal belly fat and decide that it does not concern them. For women who are of a healthy size, eat a balanced diet, and take regular exercise their menopausal stomach weight gain may be minimal and they should continue to live a healthy lifestyle.
However for other women their menopausal muffin tops can be both upsetting because of their changing image and the health consequences of an excess of belly fat.

Women who experience rapid menopausal belly weight gain and do not take regular exercise should be aware of the health risks of this menopause symptom. Weight that is gained around the middle is dangerous because the fat is surrounding vital organs and it can lead to diseases such as type II diabetes.

It’s so important that I offer free bodyfat / body composition check ups to my clients after any training session. Visceral or internal fat is dangerous and brings with it increased serious health risks – Heart disease, Diabetes, cancers and more.

Women should be motivated to combat their menopausal stomach weight gain. A woman with a goal is far more likely to succeed in losing dangerous belly fat.

Women should undertake a regular exercise routine and ensure that they are eating a healthy diet. To find out more about weight gain and how to manage this problem, search this blog for helpful posts.

If you’re local to Cheltenham get in touch for a FREE trial, or come chat about your diet and lifestyle.

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax

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