Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Tea Dance Anyone? November 4, 2014

Filed under: Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 6:19 pm
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Age is NO Excuse! October 26, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 8:26 am
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https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=365425890302133&id=100005041744648

This Gymnast is now in the Guiness Book of Records!

 

Stay Active – Age Well October 9, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Fun,Health — jax allen @ 7:33 am
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Stay Active – Age Well
Older people are challenging the stereotypical image of pensioners, says Dr Cassandra Phoenix.

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1 in 6 Over 60
We live in a society that is undergoing a dramatic demographic change. As 11 million post-war baby boomers march towards retirement, more than one in six people in the UK are aged over 65. In less than 30 years it will be one in four.

Combined with changes in social convention, such as smaller families and couples having children later in life, we’re experiencing a significant shift in the makeup of our communities.

Inactive Lifestyles Detrimental
Like much of the population, older adults often live inactive lifestyles and this can have a detrimental effect on their health and wellbeing. Add to this a swathe of negative stereotypes about what can and can’t be done in older age – and the use of words like ‘burden’ and ‘care crisis’ – and older people could be forgiven for thinking they’ve already been condemned to the scrap heap.

As we increasingly see growing older as something to fear rather than embrace, we’re confronted with a period in our lives that’s stigmatised as a time to shut down. Commonly perceived as relics of a bygone age, older people are often viewed as being immobilised by frailty – out of touch and all too often, out of sight.

Outdated Stereotypes
Yet the stories and experiences of many older people do not conform to these antiquated and outmoded stereotypes. They view retirement as an opportunity to explore new hobbies, activities and relationships, and could offer the key to helping us all age in a positive and active way.

Over the last two years our research team, based at the University of Exeter Medical School, has followed a group of active older adults as part of the Moving Stories project. We’ve talked to them about their pastimes, sports and hobbies, taken photos of them in action, and asked others what they think about their lifestyles and stories.

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We’re hoping that by listening to their accounts of ‘moving’, we can understand how and why they’ve been able to deal with the challenges of growing older and being active that everyone faces. We also want to know what role all types of physical activity, rather than just exercise, can play in ageing well.

An incredibly broad range of people from across Cornwall signed up to take part and share their stories with us – from sea swimmers, dancers and golfers, to cyclists, walkers, bowls and badminton players. Our participants ranged in age from a positively youthful 60 to a spritely 92 and continuously conveyed their enthusiasm and desire to remain fit and active.

We’re still analysing the huge amounts of data we’ve captured, but one theme has already emerged across the majority of people we spoke to and that’s the experience of pleasure.

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The importance of pleasure is under-researched in health-related areas, particularly in relation to physical activity in older age. Pleasure can take many forms but in this context we’re talking about feelings that make a person feel good, including happiness, joy, fun, and tranquillity.

Many of our participants described so-called ‘sensual’ pleasures – such as the feeling of the wind in their hair when walking outdoors, and the gliding and floating sensations of swimming through the ocean or a pool. These types of experiences show signs of the human senses connecting people with their environment and providing feelings that help contribute to happiness and wellbeing.

We found that people also drew pleasure from documenting their experiences. Whether it was through keeping a diary or writing articles for community magazines, our participants felt a sense of pleasure long after the activity had taken place. So it looks as though it’s not just the activity that can give pleasure, but what happens before and after. We think this might be an important mechanism for expanding the appeal of taking part in some form of activity.

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Get Into An Active Routine
Perhaps somewhat unexpectedly, the active older people in our study also described the pleasure they derived from simply having a routine.

The habitual nature of some of their activities gave them a structure that, in the absence of work, was very welcome.

The experience of pleasure seems like an important factor in how and why people stay active. It’s gives us an important insight into how we measure the impact of physical activity, showing being active is about much more than meeting recommended guidelines and preventing illness.

Through the help of our participants, we’re starting to uncover the other ways in which physical activity might enable us to ‘move’ through life ( later life in particular) in a positive, pleasurable way. We’re hoping our findings will influence the way that people are empowered to stay active. We’re working with AgeUK and Cornwall Sports Partnership to help this happen.

We’ve teamed up with TheatreScience to bring this project to life on stage. The play Moving Stories – Moving On has been inspired by interviews with our participants.

The opening performance is free and takes place in Truro on October 2. More information visit http://www.ecehh.org/events/moving-stories-theatre.

Dr Cassandra Phoenix is a researcher at the University of Exeter Medical School.

Read more: http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/Stay-active-grow-older-s-recipe-ageing/story-23025927-detail/story.html#ixzz3Fd7VVVBo
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Read more at http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/Stay-active-grow-older-s-recipe-ageing/story-23025927-detail/story.html#F9di2dvIcWrpL7Xs.99

 

Daily Walk Like Magic Pill September 17, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Fun,Health — jax allen @ 2:03 pm
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By Telegraph Reporter
12:18AM BST 11 Sep 2014

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Walking half an hour a day can prevent obesity and diabetes, lower the risk of some cancers, and relieve depression and anxiety, scientist says

Walking for half an hour a day is equivalent to taking a “magic pill” that combats ageing and prevents early death, a doctor has claimed.

Dr James Brown, from the School of Life and Health Sciences at Aston University, told the British Science Festival in Birmingham it could help prevent obesity and diabetes, lower the risk of some cancers, relieve depression and anxiety, increase mobility and reduce the chance of hip fractures by 40 per cent among older adults.

It also improved the ability to think and reason, slowed the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, cut arthritic pain by half, raised energy levels, reduced fatigue and led to a 23 per cent lower risk of dying.

Dr Brown said: “All of these changes are not seen in people who run marathons; they are not seen in people who lift weights in the gym, or spend four hours running on the treadmill. These are seen in people who walk and who walk for half an hour a day.

“You can get all of these health benefits, you can get a reduction in all of these diseases that are associated with ageing, by just keeping active, by walking for half an hour a day.”

Dr Carol Holland, from Aston University’s Centre for Healthy Ageing, backed his statement, saying: “Thirty minutes of moderate exercise a day can reduce your risk of age-related diseases. It can also reduce your risk of cognitive decline.”

 

Canal Trip with The Willow Trust May 14, 2014

Filed under: Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 4:04 pm
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We left Saul Junction in Gloucester just after 10:30 and arrived back after a stop for a picnic exactly on cue at 3pm.

A lovely day out , good friends, fabulous weather, green countryside and some very dodgy singing!

The Willow Trust run canal cruises with a Cream Tea for £12 per head on Saturdays once a month… See the pics below for more details.

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Great Day organised by Marilyn.

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Marilyn and Co on deck, reporting for duty.

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Some members steaming the boat – or are they really discussing Gloucester Rugby? AGAIN!
Well, once Norman and Pat get together it’ll be Rugby every time!

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Our lovely Captain, John.

 

Amazing Super Seniors #20 February 12, 2014

Filed under: Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 8:00 am
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Super seniors #20

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Hershel McGriff: The NASCAR Veteran
Life is a (very fast) highway for Hershel McGriff. He started racing cars in 1945; in 1989, at age 61, he became the oldest driver to win a NASCAR race.

But he hasn’t turned off the ignition yet: At 81, he recently competed in a national NASCAR race at Portland International Raceway, finishing 13th. NASCAR racing may be dangerous, but that doesn’t faze this Motorsports Hall of Famer.

Perhaps it’s this need for speed that keeps McGriff young at heart. “As long as I’m fast, I’m [having fun],” he said on his Web site.

Jax x

 

Amazing Super Seniors #19 February 10, 2014

Filed under: Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 8:00 am
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Super seniors # 19

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Jeannie Epper: The Senior Superhero

Many consider her “the greatest stuntwoman who’s ever lived,” according to Entertainment Weekly. Epper may be a great-grandmother, but that doesn’t stop her from jumping through glass windows and escaping from burning buildings at the ripe age of 70. In the 1970s, she served as Lynda Carter’s stunt double in the TV series Wonder Woman. Today she still performs stunts in such movies as The Back-Up Plan, The Fast and the Furious, and Kill Bill.

In fact, she’s cheated death in more than 100 Hollywood films, and she received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Taurus World Stunt Awards in 2009. Does Epper ever worry about her safety? Confidence may be the key to her success: ”As far as I’m concerned, whenever I do a stunt, it’s 150 percent going to work out,” she told EW.