Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

What’s Your Back Pain About? November 1, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 10:01 pm
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What is your back pain all about?

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Do you want to repeatedly twist your hips or crack your back?
Does your back pain subside when you are still?
Pain increases when you move?

Sacro-Illiac (SA) Pain – this is pain where your pelvis and spine meet, or that radiates out to the side of your hip, deep in your buttocks, or occasionally in the groin.
Rarely, you’ll feel pain in the front of your mid-thigh when you have an SI joint disorder. Movements that cause irritation of this injury are transition movements. It tends to hurt when going from laying to sitting, sitting to standing, or standing quietly to walking.
Generally speaking, you’ll want to repeatedly twist your hips or crack your back when you have this, but the real goal will be to ‘untwist’ your pelvis or ‘de-rotate’ your sacrum.

This responds well to a figure-4 stretch for your piriformis, posterior pelvic tilts, and balance-oriented exercises like balance board squats, etc. It tends to subside when you’re in one position for awhile, but it sucks when you go to move.

If you’re local you could try ….

Core Restore Pilates Tuesday 18:30
@ Hayden Hill Studio. Cheltenham GL51 0 SW

Follow this link for my complete teaching schedule
http://www.jaxallenfitness.com/weekly

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax.

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Core Stability Exercises How Much Is Too Much? January 29, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 3:30 pm
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Core Stability Exercises How Much Is Too Much?

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Optimising core function is really a delicate balance of exercise selection, volume, frequency, and intensity.
Unfortunately, I don’t know that we have a perfect (or even close to perfect) answer with respect to all of these factors, as everyone is different. Consider the following:

1. Flexion-intolerant backs. When you can’t bend forward easily, must be treated differently than extension-intolerant backs, those that don’t arch backwards well.

2. Trained athletes probably need a less work because of their training but can handle a greater intensity and complexity – and need to prepare the core for fatigue over an extended period (e.g., soccer game, tennis or rugby match).

3. A sedentary individual probably needs a greater frequency of low-intensity exercises.

4. In-season athletes must be careful not to do too much work and pre-fatigue the core before competition.

5. Those hyper mobile individuals with loose joints are likely to need a greater frequency of core work to wake up muscles and their nerves.

6. General exercises in a weight room or rehab setting must be complemented by sport-specific activities in the appropriate volume. When general volume goes down, specific can go up – and vice versa.

7. People with a previous history of injury – or known red flags – may need to do more just to maintain.

8. Everyone’s definitions of “core” is different. I view the core as pretty much everything between the knees and the shoulders – but the truth is that poor core control can also lead to elbow and foot/ankle issues; should we include those joints as part of the equation?

9. Everyone’s definition of “core stability exercises” is also different. Rollouts – an anterior core stability exercise – but I’ve never had more soreness in my anterior core than after doing heavy push presses. Simply holding a weight overhead forces our anterior core to work to prevent lumbar hyperextension

As you can see, the “how much is too much” question is a big, fat, hairy one. Ask 100 fitness professionals and rehabilitation specialists, and they’ll all have different answers.
Just make sure you do both active and static abdominal exercises.
Endless crunches, curl ups or sit ups just won’t give you a strong, balanced core!

JaxAllenFitness.com