Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Addicted to Bread? November 7, 2014

Loaf Lie #1: “Whole Grains & Whole Wheat are an Essential Part of a Healthy Diet”

If you’ve set foot in a grocery store or read a newspaper in the last 50 years, you’re familiar with the message that whole grains are healthy… and the more you eat, the better off you’ll be.

This is a LOT more than a “little white lie” invented to sell cheap agricultural products at huge markups… it is the biggest health scam ever perpetrated on the public!

Of course, this message comes to you from the same corporate interests and government health nannies who urged you to replace farm-fresh butter with heart stopping trans-fat (in the form of industrially-manufactured margarine).

The truth is that there is nothing “essential” about whole grains. In fact, they are among the unhealthiest foods you can consume.

One of the most important reasons is that…

Whole Grains Spike Your Blood Sugar
You probably know that high glycemic foods cause a rapid rise in blood sugar and insulin.

This triggers a cascade of inflammation and increases your risk for cancer, Alzheimer’s, heart disease, fatty liver and diabetes.

And it doesn’t make you look very good either…

High insulin levels promote the storage “visceral” belly fat, which surrounds your organs and sends metabolic messages that promote disease.

High blood sugar also causes the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) – nasty little compounds that speed up the aging process and damage tissues (especially the skin, in the form of wrinkles and lost elasticity).

And guess what?

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And it’s the specific TYPE of carbs in bread that are to blame.

About 75% of the carbohydrates in wheat are in the form of amylopectin A – a compound that is unique in just how rapidly it is transformed into glucose.

This is why wheat spikes your blood sugar higher than almost all foods – even when the same number of carbohydrates is consumed!

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And that’s not all this health-harming carb can do…

“Heart Healthy” Whole Wheat… Causes Heart Disease!
The medical establishment has greatly exaggerated the role of cholesterol in heart disease.

But there is one type of cholesterol closely linked to this killer – small dense LDL particles.

A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that people with high levels of small dense LDL have a 300% greater risk of heart attack!

Many doctors believe it is the number one risk factor for heart disease in the U.S.

And guess what triggers these dangerous compounds to form more than any other food?

It is the amylopectin A found in wheat!

Think about that the next time you see the American Heart Association “Seal of Approval” on a package of whole grain bread.

And to think they recommend you eat this food AT LEAST three times per day!

In fact, if you are eating grains this often, it might not be your fault…

Are You High on Bread?
The Addictive Properties of Wheat
You’ve probably heard that sugar triggers the same pleasure centers in the brain as drugs of addiction. That’s why it can be so hard to “just say no” to
sweet treats.

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But wheat has drug-like properties even more powerful than sugar!

That’s because in addition to the rapid sugar rush wheat provides, it also produces specific compounds that bind to morphine receptors in the brain.

In addition to subtle euphoria, these opiates cause a repetitive cycle of cravings – for more grains!

It’s no wonder a study published in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine showed that people who eat wheat consume an average of 400 calories more per day.

So, next post we’ll look at another dangerous misconception about bread (as well as cookies, crackers, cereal, pasta and cake)…

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax.

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Want To Kick Your Cravings? Try THIS 1 Food October 25, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 4:29 pm
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Want To Kick Your Cravings? Try THIS 1 Food

By Kevin DiDonato MS, CSCS, CES

People living with Diabetes have a lot to worry about.

Diabetes can lead to blindness, neuropathy, loss of toes, fingers, or limbs, and even a higher risk for having a heart attack.

So, you start to watch your carb intake, exercise, and take the right steps to controlling your diabetes.

But, you should know that new research may confirm that you could be missing the ONE key nutrient to maintaining lower blood sugar levels.

EPA and Blood Sugar Control

When you have diabetes, it’s extremely important that you control your blood sugar.

However, for some people, the issue may not lie in their insulin levels, but may rely more on their body’s ability to use the insulin to control – or lower – out of control blood sugar.

Now, for a lot of diabetics – especially those with Type 2 – your body may not be using the insulin that is being produced by your body.

Either you are not making enough to amount to lower sugar levels, or your body is resistant to insulin.

Insulin resistance – the inability for your cells to utilize insulin – may be caused by high inflammation levels caused by a poor diet rich in processed foods and refined sugars.

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Changing your diet to reduce processed foods and focus on more whole food sources, may lead to better blood sugar control and reduce risk for other chronic disease associated with diabetes, namely heart disease.

Now, changing your diet is important, but making sure you are including EPA – one of the omega-3 fatty acids – may be even MORE important for maintaining lower blood sugar.

In fact, a new study shows that EPA may provide tremendous benefits to diabetics all over the world.

In the study, the authors found that supplementing the diet of diabetics with TWO grams of purified EPA a day over the course of three months, showed some pretty amazing results.

Those in the EPA group, showed significant decreases in fasting glucose levels, HbA1c levels, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), when compared to the placebo group (corn oil pills).

EPA also resulted in a significant decrease in plasma insulin levels when compared to the placebo group.

The authors concluded: “The results of our study indicate that EPA supplementation could improve insulin sensitivity. It was able to decrease serum insulin, FPG, HbA1c and HOMA-IR. EPA could have beneficial effects on glycaemic indices in patients with T2DM.”

The Blood Sugar Solution?

As a diabetic, you understand how diet and exercise may lower your blood sugar levels and reduce your risk for chronic diseases.

But, you also know that diet and exercise may not be enough to control blood sugar, due to the way your body handles insulin.

Now, a new study shows that including the omega-3 fatty acid, EPA, may reduce not only blood sugar, but excess insulin that may be floating around in your blood.

Well, it won’t “cure” your diabetes, but EPA could go a long way to reducing your risk for heart disease, plus enhancing the other interventions you are currently doing to lower your blood sugar and improve your quality of life.

References:

Sarbolouki S, Javanbakht MH, Derakshanian H, Hosseinzadeh P, Zareei M, Hashemi SB, Dorosty AR, Eshraghian MR, Djalati M. Eicosapentaenoic acid improves insulin sensitivity and blood sugar in overweight type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a double-blind randomized clinical trial. Singapore med J. 2013;54(7):387-390.

Interesting stuff….

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax

 

12 Ancient Grains September 19, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:04 am
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12 Ancient Grains that you should consider.

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Grains like wheat, corn, oats, and rice are the most popular on the market, but ancient grains are making a comeback. Now available in many specialty health food stores like Whole Foods, these delicious grains offer more of a variety of tastes, textures, and nutrients. Some of them are even gluten-free, making them a great alternative for grain-lovers suffering from gluten intolerances. Try one (or all) of the tasty grains on our list below.

1. Polenta

A staple in Northern Italian cooking, polenta is made from ground yellow or white corn that has had the germ removed. This gluten-free, complex carbohydrate has more protein than a large egg (8.1 g per serving), and is a great alternative to bread and pasta. A single serving of polenta provides six percent of the recommended daily amount of vitamin A and 10 percent of the daily amount of vitamin C. Stone-ground whole grain cornmeal polenta is the healthiest choice. Polenta made from whole grain corn also supplies good amounts of iron, thiamin, zinc, phosphorous, and magnesium. Serve up polenta baked, boiled, or grilled as a main or side dish.

2. Bulgur

A great alternative to rice or couscous and often used in soups and salads, bulgur is a grain often used in Middle Eastern cuisine. It’s made from hard red wheat and sometimes softer, white wheat. Bulgur is high in fibre (18.3 g per serving) and manganese. It also contains 26 percent of your recommended daily needs of niacin, 14 percent of iron, and 17 percent of vitamin B6. Quick and easy to cool, bulgur can blend easily with toasted nuts (walnuts, pine nuts, pecans), berries, or sauteed veggies to make a healthy side dish. It also goes great with chicken and beef. Try blending bulgur with wheat berries and quinoa to create a fresh, light side dish.

3. Amaranth

One of the world’s oldest grains, amaranth is a South American grain that can be used in place of rice. Both gluten- and wheat-free, amaranth is high in protein (9 g per cup) and amino acids that help build brain cells like lysine, cysteine, and methionine, which aren’t found in as high concentrations in other grains. A single serving of amaranth has up to seven percent of vitamin C, 42 percent of iron, and 16 percent of calcium needs for the day. Cook amaranth in water or chicken stock with vegetables for dinner. It’s nutty, malty taste also makes it a perfect choice for breakfast when blended with nuts, dried fruit, and milk.

4. Farro

Farro, also referred to as emmer, is a wheat grain that was one of the first domesticated crops in the Fertile Crescent thousands of years ago and was used in Egyptian bread making. Farro is high in fibre (5 g per serving) and protein (6 g per serving) and provides 20 percent of your daily needs for niacin and 15 percent of your daily needs for magnesium and zinc. Farro is commonly used in Italy as a whole grain in soup, pasta, risotto, and salad dishes. It can also be used to make bread and baked goods.

5. Spelt

Spelt is an ancient grain that was commonly eaten in medieval times. While it’s part of the wheat family, people with wheat intolerances are often able to eat spelt. A single serving of spelt is high is in fibre (5 g) and protein (6 g), and provides 14 percent of the daily recommended value of magnesium and zinc, and 25 percent of iron. Spelt can be used in place or rice and pasta, used as an oatmeal alternative, or used to make muffins, waffles, pancakes, and bread.

6. Wheat Berries

A wheat berry is the entire wheat kernel, including the bran, endosperm, and germ, meaning it is a whole grain. The third most abundant crop worldwide, following rice and corn, wheat berries are a great source of healthy carbohydrates. Nutrient count varies depending on the type of wheat berries you select. They can be soft or hard and come in a variety of colors. Overall, wheat berries are high in fiber and protein and contain a variety of nutrients including vitamin E, calcium, B vitamins, folate, and potassium. Eat wheat berries in place of pasta, rice, and other grains, or use them in salads and side dishes. They’re also a great alternative to oatmeal when blended with fresh fruit and nuts.

7. Buckwheat

Buckwheat groats, also called kasha, are hulled grains from the buckwheat plant often found in Eastern Europe and Russia. Buckwheat is low in fat and offers eight percent of the daily value of niacin, six percent for vitamin B6, four percent for riboflavin and thiamin, 21 percent for magnesium, 12 percent for copper and phosphorous, and 7 percent for iron and zinc. It also contains all essential amino acids, making it a complete protein which helps with muscle-building. Add cooked buckwheat to salads, use it as a side dish, or add fruit and honey for a healthy oatmeal alternative.

8. Millet

Millet is a small, whole grain food that is a staple grain in many Asian and African countries. Whole grains like millet have been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer, and millet has also been shown to decrease the incidence of stomach ulcers. A cup of millet has just 207 calories, 6 g of protein, and 2 g of fibre. It’s also cholesterol-free and only has 3 mg of sodium per serving. Millet is also gluten-free. Quick to brown in a frying pan or pot, millet can be mixed with seasoned veggies, meats, spicy beans, and other flavorful foods.

9. Kamut

A form of grain grown in many cultures and is believed to have first been grown in Egypt or Asia, kamut is two to three times the size of common wheat and has 20-40 percent more protein and 65 percent more amino acids. Kamut is also high in essential fatty acids, which can help lower bad LDL-cholesterol and raise good HDL-cholesterol. It’s a particularly good source for thiamin, niacin, folate, riboflavin, vitamin B6, vitamin E, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, and complex carbohydrates. Similar to dried beans, kamut needs to soak for several hours before cooking. Once cooked, use it to replace rice in side dishes or use kamut powder for baking.

10. Quinoa
(My favourite for porridge)
Found in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, Chile, and Peru, quinoa means “mother grain” in Inca. Quinoa is a complete protein, meaning it has all nine essential amino acids, which have been shown to boost immunity, improve muscle quality, and regulate hormone production. It’s also a great source of high-quality protein (8 g per serving), fibre, and riboflavin, thiamin, and niacin, which help your body metabolize energy. Quinoa provides 20 percent of the iron and phosphorus that you require every day, along with 9 percent of potassium and 2 percent of calcium. A versatile, delicious grain, quinoa can easily substitute for rice and couscous in recipes, or serve it with fresh veggies.

11. Barley

Barley is a rich, bulky grain originally from Ethiopia and Southwest Asia. A nutrient dense food, barley is high in fibre, B vitamins, iron, copper, manganese, and selenium. This blend of nutrients has been linked to increased immunity and a more efficient metabolism. Barley is also low in calories and not as starchy as pasta and rice. Before cooking, always rinse barley thoroughly and use 3 cups of water for every cup of barley. Use barley flower to make breads, muffins, and cookies, stir-fry it with vegetables, or blend it stews and soups.

12. Teff

Teff, the world’s smallest grain, is made from the seed of an Ethiopian grass and made up mostly of bran and germ. This gluten-free, nutrient-dense grain contains high-quality carbs, protein (26 g per serving), minerals, and fibre, and is high in the nutrients calcium, thiamin, and iron (it has twice as much as wheat and barley). Uncooked teff can be used in baking cakes, breads, and muffins in place of small grains or seeds. For a meal, blend teff into soups and stews. It serves as a nutritious thickening agent, making it great for heavier, cool weather meals.

Eat Clean. Stay Active. Feel Great.
Jax

 

Stay Youthful #5 Combine Foods July 14, 2013

Stay Youthful Combine Foods

How to Lower the Glycemic Index of a Food
Not every carbohydrate we eat is going to have as low of a GI as we want it to. Fortunately, there are some things you can do to lower the GI of your meal, and slow the release of glucose into the blood.

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1. Add Fat – Adding fat to your meal slows down gastric emptying (the speed at which food leaves your stomach) and therefore slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream. This is one of the benefits of combining fats and carbohydrates in the same meal.

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2. Add Fibre – Fibre also slows down gastric emptying. Because of this, it gives you a much slower release of glucose. It also has the added benefit of adding bulk to your meal – helping to control hunger.

3. Combine with a Lower GI Food – The glycemic index is somewhat of a math equation. It adds up all the food you eat and takes an average. Eating a lower GI food with a high GI food will help lower the overall GI effect of your meal.

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3. Eat Protein with Your Meal – Protein isn’t a carbohydrate, but it still has a glycemic response. Protein is broken down via digestion, just like every other food you eat. Therefore, it does have an effect on blood sugar. The good thing is that whole food protein sources have an extremely low GI, and when combined with a carbohydrate source, they will dramatically lower the overall GI of your meal.

4. Use the Glycemic Index to Formulate Your Meals
Now that you know what the glycemic index is and how it influences your fat loss, you can put together a meal plan that will help your weight loss.
Think of it as a way of eating, because eating lots of low-glycemic foods is quite easy to do.

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5. Eat non-processed carbohydrate sources.
Carbohydrates like fruits, vegetables, legumes, tubers, and some grains are typically low on the GI scale. Beans tend to be the lowest because of their high fibre content.
Most fruits and vegetables are fairly low GI, as well as some tubers such as sweet potatoes.

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6. Have a source of protein with each of your meals, some healthy fats here and there, and low GI carbohydrates that are high in fibre will help your body to lose fat.

Follow these rules and you’ll control your blood sugar level, insulin response and so give your system a chance to stay healthy and youthful!
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Stay Youthful #3 Control Blood Sugar July 9, 2013

Stay Youthful #3 Control Your Blood Sugar

The Glycemic Index (GI) is a valuable tool for managing your food choices. By becoming aware of how particular foods act on your body, you can start making more informed decisions on formulating meal plans.

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What is the Glycemic Index

The glycemic index measures a particular carbohydrate food’s ability to raise your blood sugar levels relative to that of glucose. When we eat carbohydrates, they are digested and influence our blood sugar levels. Some carbohydrates raise blood glucose levels a lot (such as glucose), while others don’t affect levels much at all.
Glucose has a GI rating of 100, so every food is either equal to or lower than 100. The higher the number, the higher the blood sugar response.

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How the Glycemic Index Helps You Lose Fat

By keeping your blood glucose levels low, you will better manage our insulin response to food. As insulin is a powerful storage hormone, you want to keep it low and under control. If insulin levels are too high fat cannot be released and burnt up. Eating foods with a low GI enable a steady supply of glucose, keep insulin levels under control, and enable fat loss.

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Low GI vs Hi GI
A 5 week study evaluating the effects of a low GI diet versus a high GI diet showed the low GI diet group had a decrease in fat mass by approximately 2 pounds and an increase in lean body mass without any change in body weight. The participants changed their body composition, kept hunger at bay,felt fuller and so wanted to snack less.

Low GI vs Low Fat
In another study comparing the effects of a low GI diet to a standard reduced-fat diet to treat childhood obesity, the low GI diet group experienced a better body mass index (BMI) improvement and a lower body weight when compared to the reduced-fat group. This study shows that carbohydrate selection and control of blood glucose have a greater influence on weight loss than reducing fat intake. This is most likely due to the increased insulin sensitivity brought on by eating non-processed carbohydrate can improve the way your body reacts to insulin, so you’ll need less to have good reaction.

Follow me on Twitter. @jaxallenfitness
For daily hints &tips
Friend me on Facebook. Jax Allen
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