Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Pilates Classic Exercise – #7 Double Leg Stretch July 27, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 9:15 am
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Pilates doing Pilates Exercises: Double Leg Stretch Joseph Pilates 34 contrology poses

Important
(1) Serious students: buy & study “Return to Life…”!
(2) Avoid potential injury! – Join the “Pilates Community” at your local gym or studio.
(3) Tips on posture and muscle tensioning – “Pilates Contrology”.

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This exercise is challenging and very adaptable.
I use it in my Fatloss Fitcamp sessions by adding a twin handled medicine ball to increase the load on core and shoulder muscles.

Pilates demonstrating Double Leg Stretch, Poses One to Four:
(diagram derived from original photo).

Reference
J H Pilates and W J Miller: Return to Life through Controlology. 1st Ed, publ. 1954 J.J.Augustin New York (Review & purchase…)
Pilates Double Leg Stretch , © Bruce Thomson, EasyVigour Project

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Pilates Classic Exercise – #6 Single Leg Stretch July 20, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 9:30 am
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Pilates doing Pilates Exercises: One Leg Stretch Joseph Pilates 34 contrology poses

Important
(1) Serious students: buy & study “Return to Life…”!
(2) Avoid potential injury! – Join the “Pilates Community” at your local gym or studio.
(3) Tips on posture and muscle tensioning – “Pilates Contrology”.

Editor’s Comment: Discussion to follow. Pilates demonstrating One Leg Stretch, Poses One to Four:
(diagram derived from original picture)

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This exercise is in almost every session I teach.
Subtle changes turn a gym classic from useless and potentially dangerous into a safe and effective pilates wonder.

Ensure your pelvis is label and static, that your shoulder blades just clear the floor and your legs are low enough that your core works hard, yet, your low back remains calm and in its natural shape ( no,arching and flattening).

Don’t be frightened to pull one knee into your chest as you extend the other leg away!

Reference
J H Pilates and W J Miller: Return to Life through Controlology. 1st Ed, publ. 1954 J.J.Augustin New York
Pilates One Leg Stretch , © Bruce Thomson, EasyVigour Project

 

Core Stability Exercises How Much Is Too Much? January 29, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 3:30 pm
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Core Stability Exercises How Much Is Too Much?

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Optimising core function is really a delicate balance of exercise selection, volume, frequency, and intensity.
Unfortunately, I don’t know that we have a perfect (or even close to perfect) answer with respect to all of these factors, as everyone is different. Consider the following:

1. Flexion-intolerant backs. When you can’t bend forward easily, must be treated differently than extension-intolerant backs, those that don’t arch backwards well.

2. Trained athletes probably need a less work because of their training but can handle a greater intensity and complexity – and need to prepare the core for fatigue over an extended period (e.g., soccer game, tennis or rugby match).

3. A sedentary individual probably needs a greater frequency of low-intensity exercises.

4. In-season athletes must be careful not to do too much work and pre-fatigue the core before competition.

5. Those hyper mobile individuals with loose joints are likely to need a greater frequency of core work to wake up muscles and their nerves.

6. General exercises in a weight room or rehab setting must be complemented by sport-specific activities in the appropriate volume. When general volume goes down, specific can go up – and vice versa.

7. People with a previous history of injury – or known red flags – may need to do more just to maintain.

8. Everyone’s definitions of “core” is different. I view the core as pretty much everything between the knees and the shoulders – but the truth is that poor core control can also lead to elbow and foot/ankle issues; should we include those joints as part of the equation?

9. Everyone’s definition of “core stability exercises” is also different. Rollouts – an anterior core stability exercise – but I’ve never had more soreness in my anterior core than after doing heavy push presses. Simply holding a weight overhead forces our anterior core to work to prevent lumbar hyperextension

As you can see, the “how much is too much” question is a big, fat, hairy one. Ask 100 fitness professionals and rehabilitation specialists, and they’ll all have different answers.
Just make sure you do both active and static abdominal exercises.
Endless crunches, curl ups or sit ups just won’t give you a strong, balanced core!

JaxAllenFitness.com

 

Pilates: Truths January 10, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 8:40 pm
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Pilates: Truths

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Pilates is body conditioning that involves performing a series of controlled and very specific exercises. It will improve your strength, flexibility, posture and
co-ordination.
After class you will feel invigorated and relaxed at the same time, breath control is an important part of the Pilates Method and is a great benefit for most of us.
Even though Pilates has been around since the early 20th century, there are still many misconceptions about it.

1. Pilates is low impact exercise.

This is because there is NO impact force to your joints, as you won’t jump, walk or run in a Pilates class. ‘Impact’ is often confused with Intensity, you will find Pilates exercises can be intense even without high impact activities.

2. Pilates Will Help Give You a Flatter Stomach

This is true. Pilates focuses primarily on your core, so a person who does it faithfully will be rewarded with a flatter stomach, and a stronger back. However, for a six pack you will need to reduce your body fat %. Normal Pilates classes don’t reduce body fat!
See #6 below.

3. Pilates Can’t Cure Aches and Pains

Many people choose Pilates because it offers a safe workout, but it cannot cure aches and pains. Those who suffer from chronic pain should consult with their doctor before they start Pilates or any other form of activity.
Many of my clients are referred to me by their GP, Physiotherapist, Osteopath and Chiropractors once their treatments have completed and they need to prevent further problems.

4. Pilates Won’t Make You Taller

Pilates can create a longer, leaner look, but it will not increase your height. Some people appear taller after they have done Pilates for a while, but this is most likely due to the fact that their posture has improved. Some say that they feel taller and it could be that their intervertebral discs are plumped up rather than compressed.

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5. Pilates Can Improve Athletic Performance

Tiger Woods and Andrew Murray are two of the many athletes who admit they use Pilates to improve their performance. Dancers and cyclists also use Pilates as a part of their training regime. It helps improve strength and flexibility, which are two important components of fitness, by improving joint mobility and range of motion.
I have golfers that have found their Drive much more powerful after regular Pilates practice.

6. Pilates Can’t Help You Lose Weight

Pilates is great for toning muscles, but it is not the ideal exercise for people who want to lose weight. A 2006 study showed that Pilates does not have any significant effect on a person’s weight or body composition. Although if you build a few pounds of healthy muscle your measurements will reduce even if your scale weight remains the same. See #2 above.

7. Pilates is NOT Just for Women

Even though Pilates is viewed as an activity for women, it is also very popular among men. In fact, Pilates was invented by a man. Joseph Pilates or ‘Old Joe’. There are also a lot of male Pilates instructors.
I have many keen male clients – golfers, walkers, cyclists and extreme runners as well as desk jockeys!

8. Pilates Is Ideal for Those New to Exercise

Pilates is a great choice for the novice as all exercises can be easily progressed and regressed to suit your abilities. A mat and the right activewear are all that you need to do Pilates.
I am sometimes asked to plan and teach introductory courses for beginners within big box gyms and private health clubs.

It seems although most people have heard of Pilates they don’t really understand what it is!

If you are within travelling distance you can contact me for a FREE trial session.

Check out my teaching schedule page at http://www.JaxAllenFitness.com for available classes in Cheltenham.