Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Ageing? No Way! February 5, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 5:20 pm
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Ageing? No Way!
Whats the #1 cause of weight gain, joint pain and osteoporosis in men and women over the age of 50!

And It’s totally preventable 🙂

I’m dedicating to helping you improve not only your body, but your health and quality of life, the first thing I want address is something called sarcopenia.

Sarcopenia, is a greek word that means “poverty of the flesh” and can otherwise be known as “Muscle Wasting!”

Nearly everyone over the age of 30, who doesn’t know how to fight it is currently undergoing stages of sarcopenia.

In fact, did you know that between the ages of 30 and 60 the average man or woman loses 15lbs of muscle? And…

Did you also know that 1lb of muscle can burn 30-50 calories per day?

That means by your 40’s your metabolism will drop by burning 150-250 less calories per day…

By your 50’s your metabolism will drop by 300-500 calories per day…

And… by your 60’s if you don’t do anything about this, your metabolism will have reduced by 450-750 calories per day!

Looking at this information, it’s no wonder that people gain weight year after year all while feeling hopeless!

After all, by the time you’re 60, you would have to eat 450-750 less calories then you did at 30 just to maintain your.
However, sarcopenia, muscle wasting and the sever drop in your metabolism between the ages of 30 and 60 can easily be prevented and reversed if you know the right steps to take.
So, don’t blame the passage of time for your weight gain and middle age spread!
Stay active, Eat Clean and Feel Great

Jax

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Menopause and Belly Fat November 4, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 2:06 pm
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Menopause Weight Gain & Belly Fat

Menopausal belly fat is extremely common. As women age, they find that weight gain becomes harder to avoid and their hips and waist will begin to expand and merge.
Menopausal belly fat can be upsetting for women who find themselves obsessing over their ‘muffin tops’. Furthermore, this menopause symptom can be dangerous for a woman’s health and does not have to be accepted with blind resignation.

‘Middle Age Spread’ common NOT Normal!

There are actions that women can take to combat their belly fat.

Why Should I Worry about My Menopausal Stomach Weight Gain?

Some women may look at their menopausal belly fat and decide that it does not concern them. For women who are of a healthy size, eat a balanced diet, and take regular exercise their menopausal stomach weight gain may be minimal and they should continue to live a healthy lifestyle.
However for other women their menopausal muffin tops can be both upsetting because of their changing image and the health consequences of an excess of belly fat.

Women who experience rapid menopausal belly weight gain and do not take regular exercise should be aware of the health risks of this menopause symptom. Weight that is gained around the middle is dangerous because the fat is surrounding vital organs and it can lead to diseases such as type II diabetes.

It’s so important that I offer free bodyfat / body composition check ups to my clients after any training session. Visceral or internal fat is dangerous and brings with it increased serious health risks – Heart disease, Diabetes, cancers and more.

Women should be motivated to combat their menopausal stomach weight gain. A woman with a goal is far more likely to succeed in losing dangerous belly fat.

Women should undertake a regular exercise routine and ensure that they are eating a healthy diet. To find out more about weight gain and how to manage this problem, search this blog for helpful posts.

If you’re local to Cheltenham get in touch for a FREE trial, or come chat about your diet and lifestyle.

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax

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Stay Active – Age Well October 9, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Fun,Health — jax allen @ 7:33 am
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Stay Active – Age Well
Older people are challenging the stereotypical image of pensioners, says Dr Cassandra Phoenix.

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1 in 6 Over 60
We live in a society that is undergoing a dramatic demographic change. As 11 million post-war baby boomers march towards retirement, more than one in six people in the UK are aged over 65. In less than 30 years it will be one in four.

Combined with changes in social convention, such as smaller families and couples having children later in life, we’re experiencing a significant shift in the makeup of our communities.

Inactive Lifestyles Detrimental
Like much of the population, older adults often live inactive lifestyles and this can have a detrimental effect on their health and wellbeing. Add to this a swathe of negative stereotypes about what can and can’t be done in older age – and the use of words like ‘burden’ and ‘care crisis’ – and older people could be forgiven for thinking they’ve already been condemned to the scrap heap.

As we increasingly see growing older as something to fear rather than embrace, we’re confronted with a period in our lives that’s stigmatised as a time to shut down. Commonly perceived as relics of a bygone age, older people are often viewed as being immobilised by frailty – out of touch and all too often, out of sight.

Outdated Stereotypes
Yet the stories and experiences of many older people do not conform to these antiquated and outmoded stereotypes. They view retirement as an opportunity to explore new hobbies, activities and relationships, and could offer the key to helping us all age in a positive and active way.

Over the last two years our research team, based at the University of Exeter Medical School, has followed a group of active older adults as part of the Moving Stories project. We’ve talked to them about their pastimes, sports and hobbies, taken photos of them in action, and asked others what they think about their lifestyles and stories.

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We’re hoping that by listening to their accounts of ‘moving’, we can understand how and why they’ve been able to deal with the challenges of growing older and being active that everyone faces. We also want to know what role all types of physical activity, rather than just exercise, can play in ageing well.

An incredibly broad range of people from across Cornwall signed up to take part and share their stories with us – from sea swimmers, dancers and golfers, to cyclists, walkers, bowls and badminton players. Our participants ranged in age from a positively youthful 60 to a spritely 92 and continuously conveyed their enthusiasm and desire to remain fit and active.

We’re still analysing the huge amounts of data we’ve captured, but one theme has already emerged across the majority of people we spoke to and that’s the experience of pleasure.

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The importance of pleasure is under-researched in health-related areas, particularly in relation to physical activity in older age. Pleasure can take many forms but in this context we’re talking about feelings that make a person feel good, including happiness, joy, fun, and tranquillity.

Many of our participants described so-called ‘sensual’ pleasures – such as the feeling of the wind in their hair when walking outdoors, and the gliding and floating sensations of swimming through the ocean or a pool. These types of experiences show signs of the human senses connecting people with their environment and providing feelings that help contribute to happiness and wellbeing.

We found that people also drew pleasure from documenting their experiences. Whether it was through keeping a diary or writing articles for community magazines, our participants felt a sense of pleasure long after the activity had taken place. So it looks as though it’s not just the activity that can give pleasure, but what happens before and after. We think this might be an important mechanism for expanding the appeal of taking part in some form of activity.

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Get Into An Active Routine
Perhaps somewhat unexpectedly, the active older people in our study also described the pleasure they derived from simply having a routine.

The habitual nature of some of their activities gave them a structure that, in the absence of work, was very welcome.

The experience of pleasure seems like an important factor in how and why people stay active. It’s gives us an important insight into how we measure the impact of physical activity, showing being active is about much more than meeting recommended guidelines and preventing illness.

Through the help of our participants, we’re starting to uncover the other ways in which physical activity might enable us to ‘move’ through life ( later life in particular) in a positive, pleasurable way. We’re hoping our findings will influence the way that people are empowered to stay active. We’re working with AgeUK and Cornwall Sports Partnership to help this happen.

We’ve teamed up with TheatreScience to bring this project to life on stage. The play Moving Stories – Moving On has been inspired by interviews with our participants.

The opening performance is free and takes place in Truro on October 2. More information visit http://www.ecehh.org/events/moving-stories-theatre.

Dr Cassandra Phoenix is a researcher at the University of Exeter Medical School.

Read more: http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/Stay-active-grow-older-s-recipe-ageing/story-23025927-detail/story.html#ixzz3Fd7VVVBo
Follow us: @WMNNews on Twitter | westernmorningnews on Facebook
Read more at http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/Stay-active-grow-older-s-recipe-ageing/story-23025927-detail/story.html#F9di2dvIcWrpL7Xs.99

 

10 Tips To Prevent Falls October 2, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 4:45 pm
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I found this article on Huffington Post

It is based on our American cousins – but it works here too!

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They suggest calling a friend if you feel lonely or isolated – I’d say find a Seniors exercise group and go often!

Article: http://huff.to/1rlSRZu

Move Strong: 10 Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Falls
Celeste Carlucci 09/23/14 12:19 PM ET

1. Never put your underpants on standing up. It might sound like a no-brainer, but I can’t tell you how many older adults still take the chance of putting on their pants or underpants without stabilizing themselves by holding onto something or sitting.

2. Step on the leash to pick up the poo. Don’t risk Fido getting frisky, pulling you off balance, and sending you flying! Keep your dog close, take firm hold of the leash, then step on it while you bend down to clean up after your dog.

3. Be warned. If you think “This is unsafe — but I’ll take care of it later,” don’t wait! Often you’re not hurt “by accident,” but “by lack of action.” If I had a nickel for every time I’ve heard “I knew I should have closed the dishwasher door; picked up the magazines off the floor; tucked away that loose computer cable before leaving the room to answer the phone, the doorbell, to go to the bathroom, check emails, take a nap,” etc. Eliminate a problem when you first see it.

4. Hold the staircase railing whether you think you need to or not. Same rule applies to escalators. You never know when someone behind or ahead of you might lose his or her balance and come tumbling down. Your falls won’t always be your fault, so be alert to your environment and be cautious.

5. Gents, if you must reach in your back pocket for your wallet, and Ladies, if you need to dig into your purse — especially if your balance is a bit shaky — first, stop what you’re doing (walking, chatting with a friend, talking on your cell phone). Pause. Now proceed to look for the big bucks.

6. Don’t even think you can step over that low hedge or fence, box in the supermarket aisle, or low-hanging rope divider. Yes, people do this! And maybe when you were 20 and in a hurry you could, too. But at this age, don’t take that risk. It isn’t worth it.

7. As soon as you get the walk sign, go! If the sign has started blinking, it’s too late. Set out right away, so you never have to rush.

8. Don’t run to catch the bus, catch your grandchild, or catch your dog. I’ve seen some of the fittest older adults suffer terrible accidents trying to run across the street, play Frisbee with their dog, or play hide-and-seek with their grandkids on snow and ice.

9. Be aware of stepladders. There it is, in that high cupboard: your favorite serving platter or baking dish. If you can’t store it in a lower cupboard, then proceed with caution. Never take both hands off the ladder — especially to change an overhead light bulb. Just say no. Invite a friend to help you. A free tip from a class participant who fell off her stepladder: If you live alone, wear a medical alert device. Seriously injured, she lay several hours on the floor before someone found her.

10. When you’re feeling blue, call a friend. Being alone and isolated can increase your risk for a fall. When you remove yourself socially, stay at home more and more, your activity level drops dramatically, which leads to weaker muscles and depression. Get out with a friend and enjoy a cup of coffee together, or even better, sign up to take an exercise class together.

Remember, change begins with you. Take prevention seriously.

We all need to do the things that help us, help our family and friends move strong and reduce the risk for falls.

Be Active. Feel Better

Jax

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Pilates Classic Exercise – #3 The Roll Over June 29, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 9:30 am
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The Roll Over.

Excellent for improving the mobility of your spine.
As withe the roll up, your arm position can give you more OR less support.

Level 1 – arms along your sides, so you can push into the floor and get more movement thru your lower back. You will then focus to control your roll back down to the mat – perhaps by relaxing your arms and shoulders to put more load through your core.
Level 2/3 – lift your arms towards the ceiling or cross them over your chest so you have to work really hard to curl your back away from the floor

NOTE
You will also find that to begin your legs may not be straight out towards the floor when you have rolled them over your head. Don’t worry with practice your hamstrings ( back of your legs) will relax and stretch out. You will gain many benefits working with bent knees.

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Important
(1) Serious students: buy & study “Return to Life…”!
(2) Avoid potential injury! – Join the “Pilates Community” at your local gym or studio.
(3) Tips on posture and muscle tensioning – “Pilates Contrology”.

Editor’s Comment: Discussion to follow. Pilates demonstrating the Pilates Roll Over, Poses One to Four:
(diagram derived from original photo).

Reference
J H Pilates and W J Miller: Return to Life through Controlology. 1st Ed, publ. 1954 J.J.Augustin New York (Review & purchase…)
Pilates Roll Overs, © Bruce Thomson, EasyVigour Project

 

Pilates Classic Exercise – #2 The Roll Up June 22, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 9:30 am
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Pilates doing Pilates Exercises: The Roll Up Joseph Pilates 34 contrology poses

Important
(1) Serious students: buy & study “Return to Life…”!
(2) Avoid potential injury! – Join the “Pilates Community” at your local gym or studio.
(3) Tips on posture and muscle tensioning – “Pilates Contrology”.


Pilates Roll Up, Pose 1:-

Zip and hollow in preparation, and maintain zip and hollow throughout.
Anchor your scapulas, and keep them gently anchored throughout.
Arms “straight backward” (Important:- your back must not arch away from the ground. For those new to Pilates, this means that your arms will not make it all the way “straight backward”).

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Pilates Roll Up, Pose 2:-
(Inhaling): bring your arms up.
Toes pointing upwards.

Pilates Roll Up, Pose 3:-
(Still inhaling): Tuck your chin to your chest.
(Now exhaling): Roll upward by “wheeling the spine” off the mat.

Pilates Roll Up, Pose 4:-
(Still exhaling): roll forward until head touches legs.
Pilates demonstrating the Pilates Roll Up, Poses One to Four:
(diagram derived from original photo).

Pilates Roll Ups, Watch Points:-
Elbows and knees do not flex.
Always apply the instructions recommended in Introduction to Pilates Contrology Exercises
This exercise strengthens the spine in the forward bending direction, and must be balanced with exercises that strengthen the spine in the backward bending direction. I suggest: – “Runner’s Squat” and “The Dart”.
Pilates Roll Ups, Joseph’s Comments:-
“This exercise strengthens the abdominal muscles, and restores the spine to normal”.

Pilates then and now:-
The Roll Up is pretty much the same today. It will change the way you move! – You will be able to spot the Pilates adept by the way he or she uses this exercise to get up off the floor!

Roll Up too difficult? – Read this:-
“Many people can not perform roll-ups when first beginning a Pilates program. Keep in mind, it is easier to roll down than it is to roll up. On the way up, place your hands under the small of your back, and use your arms to help you up”(2).

Reference
J H Pilates and W J Miller: Return to Life through Controlology. 1st Ed, publ. 1954 J.J.Augustin New York (Review & purchase…)
Lisa Mercer: Pilates Based Conditioning

Pilates Roll Ups, © Bruce Thomson, EasyVigour Project

 

New SIT & BE FIT CLASS in Gloucester UK May 9, 2014

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Take Heart support group opens it’s doors to all needing to improve their balance, strength and posture.

Often as we age we develop a range of health problems that effect our balance and ability to get around this can make regular exercise sessions too noisy, too fast or just too much!

So, we’ve developed SIT & BE FIT – mobility scooter and walker friendly, we use chairs or your own scooter or wheel chair to give support while we tone and activate muscles, mobilise and loosen joints and improve postural strength.

If you, or someone you know might benefit from gentle effective exercise based on Pilates and Yoga principles get in touch for a FREE Trial.
Partners and carers are welcome, we meet on Mondays and Fridays with a nice chatty refreshment break between sessions at 11:00. Come for coffee and meet us all.

We are a happy, social bunch, with regular walks, trips and raffles.

Meet People, Have Fun, Make Friends