Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Does the Same Exercise Work At Any Age? July 15, 2016

Filed under: Fitness,Health,Uncategorized — jax allen @ 6:19 pm
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Body is very youthful, resilient, and has not experienced pain from previous injuries yet. Risk tolerance is higher and should be kept in check, while continuously pushing limits and maintaining safety. This is the era for body design.


Body is extremely capable and muscle is easiest to grow; rather than focus on ‘impact’-based activities, we’re going to focus on joint stability, core strength, and developing a ‘life’ muscle base. This way, your metabolism stays high for a very long time to come.

Physical endurance, speed maintenance, and youthful aging become the priorities. Working on the ‘inside’ of your body becomes more important than ever before, and you experience the consequences of years of prolonged sitting, standing, or repetitive motions you’ve done at work and at home. Counter-acting aging becomes the highest priority to maintain and improve the quality of your life, and time is more of a factor than ever before.

This is the era that requires you re-build strength. Your metabolism is naturally slowing down, hormonal changes related to aging are taking place in both genders, and anti-aging exercise, nutrition, and mindset become the focal points of life, rather than career or education. This is the peek of your career, the onset of golden years, and the moment that makes you want to give back and teach others. The example you set now is one others will live by for years to come.

Body, figure, balance, pain elimination. Time to ‘tune in’ your body, activate as much muscle as possible, and take your body slightly out of the comfort zone every day, so you can move like a kid again.

Having just completed a second Instructor training course for the ageing population I know that although generally any movement and activity will promote health and wellbeing at any age. 

What I have learnt over a thirty year career working with adults of all ages, is that those clients that exercise in a meaningful way,  regularly more than 3 times a week are in much better shape than those that use increasing age as a reason NOT to exercise. 

The technical side of exercise programming for me is about getting my older clients, those over 40, off the treadmill, cycle, stepper and rower.  Then persuading them to pick up some weights or a restance band on a regular basis. Everything falls into place when you maintain or increase your lean muscle mass.

 It is absolutely true that you can gain and regain fitness at any age. 

Join a specialist gym – where the trainers understand ageing, understand that being over 50 doesn’t mean that you’re disabled and weak, or that you will benefit from a nice easy walk on a treadmill for an hour! 

Find an experienced and educated trainer – who will plan a strength training program for you, to maintain important postural muscles and promote healthy movement and wellbeing. 

Independence, Falling & Joints – the correct exercises will maintain your independent lifestyle, prevent you falling or just as important your fear of falling. 

The right trainer will also advise you how to improve your nutrition and how best to keep your joint moving too. 

Specialist Health Clubs are popping up all over,  but your local community centre or village hall will have something fun and active for you to join in. Buy a dog, borrow a dog, join a walking group – just DO  something EVERY DAY!!

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Fitness After 50? April 9, 2016

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 4:40 pm
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Fitness After 50?It’s always going to be a work in progress, but just because the big 50 or even 60 is looming doesn’t mean you should back off your sport or workout routine. 

  
Workout Smart!

What is important is that you focus on what works, not what big box gyms have conned you into doing which is probably ineffective, time consuming and boring. Since the 90’s most gyms and, sadly, many instructors have plonked their members on cardio equipment for hours every week giving false promises about calorie burning and fat loss. 

I’ve worked in gyms for over 30 years and there was a time when I would advise members to step, cycle and row their way through long workouts with maybe a little weight or resistance training. But, in 1994 I attended an National Tutor update and we were shown study after study that proved fitness and shape change was not best achieved by long duration cardio training. 

Since then I have changed the way I plan personal and group sessions. 

Always encouraging clients to work outside their comfort zone. To shorten and intensify their sessions. I’ve gradually moved away from the Aerobic dance, Zumba & Exercise to music style of training – I know it doesn’t control body fat or promote lean shapely muscle and both are even more important as the years fly by. 
  

  
In 2009 I discovered HIIT high intensity interval training. This radically changed how I train my clients. Even my Super Seniors find themselves doing short intense segments within their workouts, making muscles work hard does everything you need to promote health and fitness, and without grinding away delicate and precious joints. 
50 seems like a long time ago now! And 60…..

Looking forward to it and to taking my clients along with me. 

Shorter workouts that change EVERYTIME, that challenge Balance, Strength, Stamina and Suppleness plus a little complexity to get our brains involved too. Add great music and it’s not working out its having FUN! 

So next time you find yourself thinking about cutting back and easing off because you’re 40, 45, 50 or more DONT! 

Find a trainer that understands, that is a role model and work with them! 

Train Smart

Eat Clean

Feel Great
Jax 

 

So, 50 is the new 23! February 12, 2016

Filed under: Senior Moments — jax allen @ 2:13 pm
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So 50 is the new 23!

I heard on BBCBreakfast this morning that 50 is the new 23.
That makes me about 31! Firstly in my 20’s I never even imagined  being 58. Secondly, I don’t think I want to be 31 again.
My thirties were all about ‘juggling’, pregnancy, school runs, running a business, trying to keep a family together…. Phew, I’m tired just thinking about it. 
I prefer my 50’s, I have finally learned to say No!
I no longer waste my time with friends that steal my bliss – you know the ones – the moaners, the groaners, the ‘fun sponge’ that kills the mood wherever they go.
Sure, I wouldn’t mind another crack at my 40’s, but I’d definitely not want to go back to my 20’s and definitely not now. It’s so difficult for young people to get their adult lives started. Trying to live while saving for a house deposit, insuring a car to get to work, trying to get a job with a wage high enough to live on. 
 
No, I like being in my 50’s. Enough energy and good health to enjoy pretty much anything that comes my way. Yes, that’s because as my friend Jane says ” we’ve worked at it” 
We’ve both exercised, eaten well, never smoked etc. 

Another friend, Claire, tells me that I’m ‘an early adopter’ apparently that means I’ll give most things a go! That’s something wouldn’t do in my 20’s.
 

Our favourite cafe ” Pope & prosecco” in Rome



On top a tour bus around Rome the beginning of a fab week thanks to ‘Wowcher’ never imagined the holiday would be that good.



A fantastic lunch spot on one of the islands near Venice – found by accident while chatting to another traveller on a water bus. Guggenheim in the morning, joining an Italian wedding after lunch! Another fabulous bonus day to enjoy!



Not a bad view from my “morning Yoga” balcony in Barbados. 


Saying Yes is also easier now, I find myself getting ready for a surprise holiday to Dubai!  A friend was let down by her travelling companion and so when I was offered the chance I jumped at it. 
A couple of years ago I found myself in Barbados following a similar opportunity. 
I think my moto should be ‘ something always turns up!’ It usually does. 
Let’s see what this afternoon brings, whatever age I’m supposed to be! 
Jax 
 

Study – exercise Means Better Memory November 30, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 11:00 pm
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Another study shows exercise means better memory for senior citizens



Many studies find fitness equals better mental ability – this one links it mostly to long-term memory

By Tucker Sutherland, editor, SeniorJournal.com

Nov. 24, 2015 – A new study released today declares that older adults who take more steps than most by walking or jogging performed better on memory tasks. Really, how could this be news? It is just another way of looking at physical fitness and how it enhances memory and cognitive ability. But, this one does find a new twist.

 As the editor of SeniorJournal.com for 16 years I have reported on dozens of studies that have come up with the same result – physical fitness, which can be obtained in many ways, helps people stay mentally fit as they age.

I’m not complaining but I am declaring this is an established reality – exercise equals better mental performance as people age. 

This research started with the question, “Could staying physically active improve quality of life by delaying cognitive decline and prolonging an independent lifestyle?”

 

“Absolutely,” is the answer I could have provided before their study. It has been proven in dozens of studies – maybe hundreds – that primarily have varied only by the technique used to gain the physical fitness – running, walking, swimming, weight-lifting, dancing, hula hoop, etc.





The differences in this study is it looked at groups of both young and old adults. Which leadsthem to look at long-term versus short-term memory.

The report appears online in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.

The study included 29 young adults (ages 18-31) and 31 older adults (ages 55-82) who wore a small device called an ActiGraph, which recorded information including how many steps each took, how vigorous the steps were and how much time it involved. These are used in many, many studies of physical exercise.

Participants also completed neuropsychological testing to assess their memory, planning and problem-solving abilities. 

In addition to standardized neuropsychological tasks of executive function (planning and organization abilities) and long-term memory, participants engaged in a laboratory task in which they had to learn face-name associations. 

The researchers found that older adults who took more steps per day had better memory performance. 

And, what will appeal to many elderly, the association between the number of steps taken was strongest with a task that required recalling which name went with a person’s face – the same type of everyday task that older adults often have difficulty with. 

In young adults, the number of steps taken was not associated with memory performance.

It is long-term memory that is improved by activity

This lead them to the conclusion that the effects of physical activity extend to long-term memory – the same type of memory that is negatively impacted by aging and neurodegenerative dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease. 

”Our findings that physical activity is positively associated with memory is appealing for a variety of reasons. Everyone knows that physical activity is a critical component to ward off obesity and cardiovascular-related disease. Knowing that a lack of physical activity may negatively impact one’s memory abilities will be an additional piece of information to motivate folks to stay more active,” explained corresponding author Scott Hayes, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine and the Associate Director of the Neuroimaging Research for Veterans Center at the VA Boston Healthcare System.

The authors point out that staying physically active can take a variety of forms from formal exercise programs to small changes, such as walking or taking the stairs. 

“More research is needed to explore the specific mechanisms of how physical activity may positively impact brain structure and function as well as to clarify the impact of specific exercise programs (e.g., strength, aerobic, or combined training) or dose of exercise (frequency, intensity, duration) on a range of cognitive functions,” added Hayes.

The authors say that the objective measurement of physical activity was a key component of their study, because the majority of studies to date have used self-report questionnaires, which can be impacted by memory failures or biases.

This work was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation Research & Development Service and Clinical Science Research & Development Service [MV]. Assistance with participant recruitment was provided by the Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (P50-AG005134) and Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Center (P30-AG13846).



 

Armchair Athlete? November 12, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:35 am
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 Adapted from an article ….

Sports Performance Bulletin

Issue No. 225, November 9, 2015

  
This article is very interesting…. I know what he means. I’ve been teaching multiple fitness classes most days since 1983, some days it feels like 1883! 

Maintaining muscle mass, good quality sleep and eating protein IS key! 

Tips for the Ageing (armchair) Athlete 

From

David Joyce

Editor, Sports Performance Bulletin

Tips for the ageing athlete 

  
One of the reasons I love working in sport is that you are constantly surrounded by young people and their questionable fashion, language and music! I firmly believe that you’re only as old as you want to be, and that there’s a marked difference between being aged and being old.
Age is something that happens due to the inexorable passing of time, and there are certain strategies that we can implement to ensure that we lessen the decay that Father Time wants to impart.
Firstly, a decline in muscle power doesn’t just creep up. It hits you square in the face. A fall that leads to a fractured hip is one of the biggest causes of so-called age-related hospital admissions in the Western World. We know, that a huge part of this stems back to poor muscle strength and power.
So, is there anything we can do about this? Of course there is! 
You are never too old to lift heavy things! Sure, there may be a decline in what you can lift when you’re 80 compared to when you’re 35, but there is stacks of scientific research that has been done that demonstrates that even 90 year-olds can gain both muscle size and strength following a targeted strength programme. 
The most effective exercises are the ones that you do, so, in other words, any exercise that has an overload demand attached to it will develop strength. Should we teach a 60 year old to power clean if they’ve never done it before? Possibly not, because this complex lift is as much about skill as it is about strength, but if the 60 year old is well trained in its technique, there’s no reason why they shouldn’t continue to lift in this manner. 
Often, the time it takes to recover following a strength session is longer as we get older. This needs to be taken into account when planning training, in particular taking care to space out plyometric work, even for the masters athlete that is well attuned to this activity. 
In terms of nutrition, there is now plenty of evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of a diet high in protein being especially important for the mature athlete, to counteract the sarcopaenia (muscle fibre loss) that coincides with increasing number of candles on the birthday cake.

Interesting…. I know what he means. I’ve been teaching multiple fitness classes most days since 1983, some days it feels like 1883! 

Maintaining muscle mass, good quality sleep and eating protein IS key! 

Jax  

 

Pilates Classic Exercise – #6 Single Leg Stretch July 20, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 9:30 am
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Pilates doing Pilates Exercises: One Leg Stretch Joseph Pilates 34 contrology poses

Important
(1) Serious students: buy & study “Return to Life…”!
(2) Avoid potential injury! – Join the “Pilates Community” at your local gym or studio.
(3) Tips on posture and muscle tensioning – “Pilates Contrology”.

Editor’s Comment: Discussion to follow. Pilates demonstrating One Leg Stretch, Poses One to Four:
(diagram derived from original picture)

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This exercise is in almost every session I teach.
Subtle changes turn a gym classic from useless and potentially dangerous into a safe and effective pilates wonder.

Ensure your pelvis is label and static, that your shoulder blades just clear the floor and your legs are low enough that your core works hard, yet, your low back remains calm and in its natural shape ( no,arching and flattening).

Don’t be frightened to pull one knee into your chest as you extend the other leg away!

Reference
J H Pilates and W J Miller: Return to Life through Controlology. 1st Ed, publ. 1954 J.J.Augustin New York
Pilates One Leg Stretch , © Bruce Thomson, EasyVigour Project

 

Think You’re Too Old To Get Fit & Healthy? July 15, 2014

Most people, especially as they age, have lost faith in their ability to burn off fat and get in shape.

They’ve given in to the idea that an unattractive body shape, poor muscle tone and a sluggish metabolism are inevitable… that their best days are behind them.

But NOTHING could be further from the truth — your body has simply changed.

And doing what MAY have worked for you 10, 20, 30 years ago is simply NOT going to cut it today.

Instead, to get the results you want, you need a DIFFERENT approach… one that takes advantage of a recent breakthrough in exercise science that overcomes a poor functioning metabolism.

Most people try to start exercising more or harder, but that only makes a bad situation worse as your energy levels plummet, your appetite skyrockets and intense cravings set in.

Or perhaps they try one of those crazy “insane” infomercial workouts that assume you have the fitness level of a 20yr old — putting you at risk for damaging your joints, pulling muscles or injuring your back.

Fortunately, emerging research is showing that an “intelligent” form of metabolic training is remarkably effective at combating frustrating fat gain, sagging muscles and a deteriorating body shape.

It also helps turn back the clock by saturating your cells with a cocktail of anti-aging bio-chemicals that get your blood sugar under control, optimize your cholesterol, lower blood pressure, lift mental performance and strengthen your heart and lungs

PLUS how it can all be done in 45 seconds or less. Really.

It all starts with these 3 powerful metabolic advantages that get real, VISIBLE results…fast.

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Metabolic Advantage #1: 3-in-1 Training
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If you do cardio (running, spinning, aerobics, etc.), yeah, you’ll burn some fat, but you’ll also burn A LOT of muscle, becoming “skinny fat” with saggy, droopy skin and flabby muscles.

Weight training can be good for building muscles — but if not done correctly, not only will it NOT burn fat, but it’ll make you look bulkier — like putting on a sweater underneath a winter jacket.

Yoga is GREAT for nervous system coordination, flexibility and core strength, but it falls short when it comes to burning fat — it’s just not designed to do that.

What’s the answer? It’s to combine the best of all 3 types of training into a single, ultra-short session that torches fat, tones muscles and that’s safe for anybody to do at any age — exactly what intelligent metabolic training does.

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Metabolic Advantage #2: An Expanded Fat Burning Window
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Another major problem of conventional workouts is their focus on burning fat DURING the workout.

That’s a HUGE mistake that only damages your metabolism further and robs you of your full fat loss potential.

The key is to trigger your body to burn as much fat as possible AFTER your workout — exactly what intelligent metabolic training does.

A study conducted in 2008 publish in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning showed that compared to regular workouts, a metabolically intelligent workout can burn up to 10 times MORE fat.

It does this by releasing a tidal wave of special metabolic molecules DURING the workout that send a powerful “adaptation” signal to your body to boost metabolism, burn fat and cool inflammation AFTER the workout.

Your body then scrambles to replenish the intramuscular raw materials it burned up DURING the workout in a process that burns fat calories for 2-3 days AFTER the workout.

And guess where it gets the raw materials to replenish those resources?
Thankfully, straight from the extra padding that’s parked on your belly, hips, thighs and butt.

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Metabolic Advantage #3: Permanently Upgrade Fat Burning
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Wish you could be burning fat all the time, regardless of what you’re doing?

Intelligent metabolic training does this with advantage #3, which sets off a process known as mitochondrial biogenesis — a fancy term for building new energy-producing power plants.

Since those power plants are mostly inside muscles, your muscles improve — getting more toned and tighter — dramatically improving your body shape.

In fact, that same 2008 study also showed that those doing the metabolically intelligent workouts improved muscle shape by 82.2% vs. the regular workout.

And thanks to all of those new fat burning mitochondria you burn more fat calories while at rest, making you a better fat burner — not just 2-3 days after your workout, but ALL OF THE TIME!

When you’re sitting on the couch watching TV, sleeping at night or working at your desk, your body is burning up generally a higher level of fat than it was before.

If you attend my studio in Cheltenham you will be experiencing these NEW ME workouts, rest based training is different, you’ll work harder knowing there’s no Shane in resting whenever and for as long as you need, before picking up where you left off.

Being rewarded for resting is a breath of fresh air, when most trainers and coaches are still shouting ‘go harder’, ‘ keep going’ and really teaching their clients to pace themselves and never really push themselves!

Find an ME coach and try a session!
Your Metabolism will thank you for it…

Eat Clean, Live Well, Feel Great

Jax

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