Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Bread Just UnHealthy December 5, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:30 am
Tags: , , , ,

Loaf Lie #5: “There is No Such Thing as a Healthy Loaf of Bread”

If all this bread bashing has caused you to reluctantly swear off buns, biscuits, bagels and baguettes forever, I understand. After all, if whole-grain and most gluten-free breads are bad for you… what else is there?

Well, I have great news…

You Don’t Have to Choose Between Your “Daily Bread”And Being Healthy
You Just Have to Choose Healthy Bread!

20141105-232937-84577013.jpg

What if you could sink your teeth into a hot stack of French toast… a sandwich thick enough to make Dagwood proud… a chewy bagel…. or a crusty piece of fresh-baked focaccia…

And what if these delicious real-food breads were not only gluten-free… but low glycemic too?

When you choose bread made with “intelligent ingredients” it can actually protect – not wreck – your health.

It can even help you sculpt a lean physique… instead of puffing up your muffin top!

And I’m not talking about weak imitations. I’m talking about REAL bread so delicious you’ll swear that it’s bad for you.

And you won’t believe just how easy it can be…

You will find real bread recipes and good artisan bakers if you look for them.
Don’t simply swap cheap, nasty supermarket bread with cheap nasty gluten free products.

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax

Advertisements
 

Grains Bad for Your Brain! November 28, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:30 am
Tags: , , , ,

Loaf Lie #4: “If Wheat Doesn’t Cause You Digestive Distress, then it’s Safe to Eat”

When some people eat the tiniest bit of wheat or gluten, they can be doubled over in pain or running to the bathroom within minutes.

In a way, these people have an advantage… at least they can identify the problem and its source.

But just because you feel fine after eating a bagel, doesn’t mean it is not damaging your body.

What You Don’t Know (or Notice) Can Still Hurt You…
Studies show that even if you are NOT “gluten intolerant” these foods can cause inflammation and perforations in the gut – allowing unwanted substances to “leak” into your bloodstream.

And you might not feel the slightest gurgle in your belly. In fact, almost 50% of newly diagnosed celiac patients have no noticeable abdominal distress.

Yet, with each bite you are causing damage to nearly every tissue, system and organ in your body.

Here are just a few of the symptoms this can cause:

Headaches and fatigue
Chronic sinus issues and lowered immunity
Arthritis, bone and joint pain
Nutrient deficiencies, and
A VERY long list of skin conditions, including everything from acne to wrinkles.
More troubling is that…

This Can Set the Stage for an Astonishing Variety of Diseases
Research shows that wheat can trigger a variety of autoimmune conditions (where the body attacks itself), including: type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.

It can also cause chronic disease…

The Journal of the American Medical Association published a report showing that gluten sensitive people who still consume grains increase their risk of death up to 75%!

The New England Journal of Medicine lists 55 conditions that can be caused by eating gluten, including:

Cancer
Heart Disease
Osteoporosis
Irritable Bowel Disease
Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue
Thyroid disorders
Anemia
Epilepsy
Canker Sores
Lupus

20141105-231914-83954320.jpg

And it doesn’t just affect your body…

Bread Madness:

Don’t Destroy Your Brain with Grain
More than 50 years ago, doctors discovered that some mental patients made spontaneous recoveries when bread was not available to them.

The term “bread madness” was even coined to describe schizophrenia.

Recently, doctors at Duke University reported on a woman who had a 50-year history of delusions, hallucinations and suicide attempts. Within a week of stopping wheat, her symptoms disappeared!

Now, I’m sure you’re perfectly sane…

But if you (or someone you know) has ever suffered from depression… insomnia… anxiety… dementia… or nearly any other psychiatric or neurological condition – there’s a good chance a grain-free diet would help.

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax

 

Gluten Problem or Wheat Problem? November 21, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:00 am
Tags: , , , ,

Loaf Lie #3: “If You Don’t Have a Problem with Gluten, You Don’t Have a Problem with Wheat”

Most people are aware that a little protein in wheat can cause BIG problems for some people.

For those with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity (two completely different conditions), even a small amount of gluten can cause serious digestive problems… systemic inflammation… autoimmune disease… and the list goes on.

At least 300 health-related issues have been linked to gluten.

But here’s the thing…

Gluten is a REAL Problem…
But the Problem is NOT Just Gluten!

Most doctors (mistakenly) believe that any problems with wheat are problems with gluten. In other words, if you don’t have a problem with gluten… you don’t have a problem.

However, the protein we call “gluten” actually consists of hundreds of smaller compounds. Any ONE of these could trigger an inflammatory or immune response.

And that’s not even a fraction of the whole story, because…

According to a study published in Plant Physiology, modern wheat is capable of producing at least 23,788 unique proteins!

This would explain the studies where people have shown a severe reaction to wheat – and no reaction at all to gluten itself, even in high doses.

The problem is that conventional lab testing looks for just two antibodies related to gluten.

20141105-230531-83131112.jpg

If you test negative for these two, most doctors will give you a clean bill of health – and probably tell you that any symptoms you’re experiencing are “all in your head.”

But science has found numerous compounds in grains – besides gluten – which can cause serious long-term health issues…

20141105-230609-83169066.jpg

The Powerful Chemical in Wheat That Protects it from Being Eaten

Unlike animals, plants cannot escape being eaten. That’s why many plants have defenses to discourage predation. Thorns on a cactus are an obvious example.

But wheat and grains have defenses too, including compounds which can deprive you of vital nutrients and slowly leak out toxic effects. (This is called a HINT!)

One of these is wheat germ agglutinin (WGA).

Studies show that WGA can have direct toxic effects on most tissues in your body, including the heart and brain.In fact, it enters the brain so easily that scientists are hopeful it can be used to deliver Alzheimer’s drugs.

Like gluten, WGA can also disrupt your hormonal system, weaken immunity, cause digestive problems and promote systemic inflammation (the cornerstone of degenerative disease).

And the highest concentrations of it are found in whole grains – including supposedly “healthy” sprouted grains!

Eat Clean. Train Smart. Expect Results.

Jax

 

12 Ancient Grains September 19, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:04 am
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

12 Ancient Grains that you should consider.

IMG_1583.JPG

Grains like wheat, corn, oats, and rice are the most popular on the market, but ancient grains are making a comeback. Now available in many specialty health food stores like Whole Foods, these delicious grains offer more of a variety of tastes, textures, and nutrients. Some of them are even gluten-free, making them a great alternative for grain-lovers suffering from gluten intolerances. Try one (or all) of the tasty grains on our list below.

1. Polenta

A staple in Northern Italian cooking, polenta is made from ground yellow or white corn that has had the germ removed. This gluten-free, complex carbohydrate has more protein than a large egg (8.1 g per serving), and is a great alternative to bread and pasta. A single serving of polenta provides six percent of the recommended daily amount of vitamin A and 10 percent of the daily amount of vitamin C. Stone-ground whole grain cornmeal polenta is the healthiest choice. Polenta made from whole grain corn also supplies good amounts of iron, thiamin, zinc, phosphorous, and magnesium. Serve up polenta baked, boiled, or grilled as a main or side dish.

2. Bulgur

A great alternative to rice or couscous and often used in soups and salads, bulgur is a grain often used in Middle Eastern cuisine. It’s made from hard red wheat and sometimes softer, white wheat. Bulgur is high in fibre (18.3 g per serving) and manganese. It also contains 26 percent of your recommended daily needs of niacin, 14 percent of iron, and 17 percent of vitamin B6. Quick and easy to cool, bulgur can blend easily with toasted nuts (walnuts, pine nuts, pecans), berries, or sauteed veggies to make a healthy side dish. It also goes great with chicken and beef. Try blending bulgur with wheat berries and quinoa to create a fresh, light side dish.

3. Amaranth

One of the world’s oldest grains, amaranth is a South American grain that can be used in place of rice. Both gluten- and wheat-free, amaranth is high in protein (9 g per cup) and amino acids that help build brain cells like lysine, cysteine, and methionine, which aren’t found in as high concentrations in other grains. A single serving of amaranth has up to seven percent of vitamin C, 42 percent of iron, and 16 percent of calcium needs for the day. Cook amaranth in water or chicken stock with vegetables for dinner. It’s nutty, malty taste also makes it a perfect choice for breakfast when blended with nuts, dried fruit, and milk.

4. Farro

Farro, also referred to as emmer, is a wheat grain that was one of the first domesticated crops in the Fertile Crescent thousands of years ago and was used in Egyptian bread making. Farro is high in fibre (5 g per serving) and protein (6 g per serving) and provides 20 percent of your daily needs for niacin and 15 percent of your daily needs for magnesium and zinc. Farro is commonly used in Italy as a whole grain in soup, pasta, risotto, and salad dishes. It can also be used to make bread and baked goods.

5. Spelt

Spelt is an ancient grain that was commonly eaten in medieval times. While it’s part of the wheat family, people with wheat intolerances are often able to eat spelt. A single serving of spelt is high is in fibre (5 g) and protein (6 g), and provides 14 percent of the daily recommended value of magnesium and zinc, and 25 percent of iron. Spelt can be used in place or rice and pasta, used as an oatmeal alternative, or used to make muffins, waffles, pancakes, and bread.

6. Wheat Berries

A wheat berry is the entire wheat kernel, including the bran, endosperm, and germ, meaning it is a whole grain. The third most abundant crop worldwide, following rice and corn, wheat berries are a great source of healthy carbohydrates. Nutrient count varies depending on the type of wheat berries you select. They can be soft or hard and come in a variety of colors. Overall, wheat berries are high in fiber and protein and contain a variety of nutrients including vitamin E, calcium, B vitamins, folate, and potassium. Eat wheat berries in place of pasta, rice, and other grains, or use them in salads and side dishes. They’re also a great alternative to oatmeal when blended with fresh fruit and nuts.

7. Buckwheat

Buckwheat groats, also called kasha, are hulled grains from the buckwheat plant often found in Eastern Europe and Russia. Buckwheat is low in fat and offers eight percent of the daily value of niacin, six percent for vitamin B6, four percent for riboflavin and thiamin, 21 percent for magnesium, 12 percent for copper and phosphorous, and 7 percent for iron and zinc. It also contains all essential amino acids, making it a complete protein which helps with muscle-building. Add cooked buckwheat to salads, use it as a side dish, or add fruit and honey for a healthy oatmeal alternative.

8. Millet

Millet is a small, whole grain food that is a staple grain in many Asian and African countries. Whole grains like millet have been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer, and millet has also been shown to decrease the incidence of stomach ulcers. A cup of millet has just 207 calories, 6 g of protein, and 2 g of fibre. It’s also cholesterol-free and only has 3 mg of sodium per serving. Millet is also gluten-free. Quick to brown in a frying pan or pot, millet can be mixed with seasoned veggies, meats, spicy beans, and other flavorful foods.

9. Kamut

A form of grain grown in many cultures and is believed to have first been grown in Egypt or Asia, kamut is two to three times the size of common wheat and has 20-40 percent more protein and 65 percent more amino acids. Kamut is also high in essential fatty acids, which can help lower bad LDL-cholesterol and raise good HDL-cholesterol. It’s a particularly good source for thiamin, niacin, folate, riboflavin, vitamin B6, vitamin E, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, and complex carbohydrates. Similar to dried beans, kamut needs to soak for several hours before cooking. Once cooked, use it to replace rice in side dishes or use kamut powder for baking.

10. Quinoa
(My favourite for porridge)
Found in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, Chile, and Peru, quinoa means “mother grain” in Inca. Quinoa is a complete protein, meaning it has all nine essential amino acids, which have been shown to boost immunity, improve muscle quality, and regulate hormone production. It’s also a great source of high-quality protein (8 g per serving), fibre, and riboflavin, thiamin, and niacin, which help your body metabolize energy. Quinoa provides 20 percent of the iron and phosphorus that you require every day, along with 9 percent of potassium and 2 percent of calcium. A versatile, delicious grain, quinoa can easily substitute for rice and couscous in recipes, or serve it with fresh veggies.

11. Barley

Barley is a rich, bulky grain originally from Ethiopia and Southwest Asia. A nutrient dense food, barley is high in fibre, B vitamins, iron, copper, manganese, and selenium. This blend of nutrients has been linked to increased immunity and a more efficient metabolism. Barley is also low in calories and not as starchy as pasta and rice. Before cooking, always rinse barley thoroughly and use 3 cups of water for every cup of barley. Use barley flower to make breads, muffins, and cookies, stir-fry it with vegetables, or blend it stews and soups.

12. Teff

Teff, the world’s smallest grain, is made from the seed of an Ethiopian grass and made up mostly of bran and germ. This gluten-free, nutrient-dense grain contains high-quality carbs, protein (26 g per serving), minerals, and fibre, and is high in the nutrients calcium, thiamin, and iron (it has twice as much as wheat and barley). Uncooked teff can be used in baking cakes, breads, and muffins in place of small grains or seeds. For a meal, blend teff into soups and stews. It serves as a nutritious thickening agent, making it great for heavier, cool weather meals.

Eat Clean. Stay Active. Feel Great.
Jax

 

5/13 Lies That Make You Fat and Sick – Wheat November 11, 2013

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:30 am
Tags: , , , , , , ,

5. Everyone Should be Eating “Heart-Healthy” Whole Wheat

20131101-134751.jpg

Commonly mistaken as a health food, evidence is mounting that wheat can contribute to various health problems.

Yes… this includes “heart-healthy” whole wheat.

Wheat is the biggest source of gluten in the diet. New studies are showing that a significant percentage of the population may be sensitive to it (38, 39, 40).

In sensitive individuals, gluten can contribute to various symptoms like digestive issues, pain, bloating, stool inconsistency, fatigue and may damage the lining of the intestine (41, 42, 43, 44).

There are also some controlled trials associating wheat gluten with various disorders of the brain, including schizophrenia, autism and cerebellar ataxia (45, 46, 47).

Not only that… but a controlled trial in humans showed that whole wheat increased various risk factors for cardiovascular disease in as little as 12 weeks (48).

Even though whole wheat is “less unhealthy” than refined wheat, the best choice would be to skip the wheat altogether.

Bottom Line: Wheat is the biggest source of gluten in the diet. Many studies are showing that wheat, including whole wheat, can contribute to various health problems.

Like this post? Follow my blog. Thanks Jax

 

Is Bread The Food of The Devil? July 20, 2013

Foods of the Devil!
1. Bread

20130720-211038.jpg
If you are serious about improving your health and losing body fat, not only do you need to think about being more active you need to stop buying bread. Let me explain why? It all also depends on the type of bread you’re buying! But just as killing is still killing, bread is still bread:

Bread Increases blood sugar levels:
Wheat contains amylopectin A, a type of molecule that is easier to convert to blood sugar than just about any other carbohydrate. Your blood sugar level increases and in a matter of 2-hours you’re hungry, AGAIN! Wheat intake puts your body through a series of highs and lows, and becomes stuck in a vicious cycle of endless hunger and cravings.

Difficult to digest:
Breads generally contain gluten. Gluten is very difficult for the human body to digest and it demands a very strong acid in the stomach.

There are other harmful substances in bread:
Most grains also include the “anti nutrient” phytic acid. Phytic acid is a molecule that strongly binds essential minerals like calcium, iron and zinc, preventing them from being absorbed.

Whole wheat raises bad cholesterol:
Whole wheat is better than refined wheat, but still not good:
It’s true that whole grain breads are better for you than breads made with refined grains. They contain more nutrients and fibre but they’re just the lesser of two evils. Whole wheat bread and refined bread is like unfiltered cigarettes and filtered cigarettes. Filtered cigarettes are still deadly.

Bread produces Mucus:
Bread is part of the refined grain family joining other grains like barley, oats and rye all of which produce mucus in the body.

Addictive:
As humans, we always want what we cant have! But Researchers discovered that the gluten found in bread delights the brains opiate receptors bringing forth a sense of euphoria when eaten. So the more you have it, the more you want it!

6 reasons to avoid bread so think –
NO more Toast for Breakfast
NO more Sandwiches for Lunch
NO more Bread rolls with Dinner

Eat Well, Feel Great, Enjoy Life

Jax x
Follow me on Twitter. @jaxallenfitness
For daily hints &tips
Friend me on Facebook. Jax Allen
For interest pages, group & Offers.