Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Menopause Monday #4 Weight Gain – Unstoppable? August 25, 2014

Piling on the pounds can easily happen during menopause
Many women find it hard to control their weight during menopause but most put this down to poor diet or lack of exercise.

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In fact, the hormonal changes that menopause brings are an important factor in weight gain and can make losing weight more difficult.

As we start the change, production of our body’s two major hormones, oestrogen and progesterone, starts to fall. This in itself is entirely natural.

However in Western societies, a combination of factors including extended use of birth control, processed foods and environmental toxins, cause progesterone levels to drop much faster than in societies where these factors are not present. The result is a condition called oestrogen dominance.

Oestrogen dominance is an imbalance between oestrogen and progesterone levels whereby, instead of the two hormones being relatively equal to each other, the ratio of oestrogen is elevated.

“My anxiety has gone, all my womanly feelings have returned, I lost 7 pounds in weight in 10 days (no dieting) – no more bloating…”
Jane – age 49 Surrey, UK

This can occur even with low oestrogen levels, and the symptoms are easily recognised: hot flushes, night sweats, mood swings etc.

Less well known is that oestrogen, when unchecked by progesterone, interferes with thyroid function, reducing its effectiveness.

This stimulates an increase in the production of insulin, leading to increased conversion of carbohydrate into fat, as well as sugar cravings. The result is that the weight piles on much easier and slimming down is much harder.

“There are no doubt good evolutionary reasons for some of oestrogen’s seemingly negative actions on the body such as water retention and weight gain. If we think of oestrogen in terms of procreation and survival of the fetus, it would seem advantageous to the baby for the expectant mother, in times of famine, to store body fat.”
Dr John Lee MD – What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About The Menopause

Supplementing with natural progesterone products, such as Wellsprings Serenity and 20-1 cream, helps restore hormonal balance and in doing so can make weight control throughout menopause much easier to manage.

Food or rather Cream for thought.

Eat Clean. Stay Active. Feel Great

Jax

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Menopause Monday – Fight Symptoms Naturally! July 14, 2014

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My favourites are Sage & Lemon Balm tea, restricting coffee, alcohol and nicotine goes well with a clean eating, healthy lifestyle.
I regularly use red beets in my diet – either chopped into salad or shredded in wraps and an essential ingredient to my daily veggie smoothies.

I’ve found smoothies the easiest way to get the 5 minimum and ideal 9 vegetables every day. I go for any dark green or red veg, then add a little fruit from thin skinned berries.

My research has led me towards raspberries, grapes and blueberries for fruits.

The vegetables I use are spinach, avocado, broccoli, kale and sweet bell peppers.

For nuts and seeds- to increase the Omega 3 content- I’ve been adding a mixture of linseed, sunflower seeds and goji berries. I quite like the crunch the seeds give.

I add a clean protein powder to one smoothie and have it as a snack, the other daily mix I have either after my high protein breakfast or mid morning.

Try it they’re delicious. Its too early to know if they help with menopause symptoms. But, I will let you know how I get on.

Now, I’m off to make sage and lemon balm tea!!

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Eat Clean. Live Well. Feel Great!

 

Obesity Raises Breast Cancer Death Risk in Pre-Menopausal Women May 25, 2014

Filed under: Health — jax allen @ 9:24 am
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Obesity Raises Breast Cancer Death Risk in Pre-Menopausal Women
By Nicole Ostrow May 15, 2014

Women younger than 50 who are obese and have a common form of breast cancer have a higher risk of dying from the disease than women with the cancer who are normal weight, researchers said.

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Being obese was associated with a 34 percent increased chance of breast cancer death in pre-menopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive disease, which responds to hormone treatment, an analysis of 70 clinical trials found. The study, released yesterday, will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting beginning May 30 in Chicago.

The research is among the latest to tie obesity to cancer risk and the largest to examine weight’s role in the prognosis of estrogen-receptor positive breast malignancy and menopausal status, the authors said. Obesity is associated with increased dangers of other cancers including esophagus, endometrium, colon, kidney, pancreas, thyroid and gallbladder, according to the National Cancer Institute.

“This study is part of the growing body of evidence showing that patients who are obese generally fare worse with cancer –- in this case, younger women with breast cancer,” Clifford Hudis, president of the cancer doctors’ group, said in a statement. “With some two-thirds of our nation’s adult population now obese or overweight, there’s simply no avoiding obesity as a complicating factor in cancer care.”

Breast cancer is the most diagnosed cancer among U.S. women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two-thirds of all breast tumors are fed by estrogen, according to the National Institutes of Health. More than 230,000 women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year and 40,000 will die.

Study Results

The study’s results showed no association between weight and death in post-menopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive disease, a surprise finding because obesity increases blood estrogen levels in older women, said lead study author Hongchao Pan.

“This is exactly the opposite of what we expected,” Pan, a senior research fellow at the University of Oxford in the U.K., said in a telephone interview. “We know the effect is definite and real. We don’t know the mechanisms that underlie the association at the moment.”

Researchers in the study looked at 80,000 women in 70 clinical trials. Of those, 20,000 were pre-menopausal with ER-positive disease, 40,000 had ER-positive disease and were post-menopausal and 20,000 were pre-menopausal with ER-negative disease.

They found that both overweight and obese pre-menopausal women had a higher risk of dying from ER-positive breast cancer compared with women who were normal weight.