Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Menopause Monday – Fight Symptoms Naturally! July 14, 2014

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My favourites are Sage & Lemon Balm tea, restricting coffee, alcohol and nicotine goes well with a clean eating, healthy lifestyle.
I regularly use red beets in my diet – either chopped into salad or shredded in wraps and an essential ingredient to my daily veggie smoothies.

I’ve found smoothies the easiest way to get the 5 minimum and ideal 9 vegetables every day. I go for any dark green or red veg, then add a little fruit from thin skinned berries.

My research has led me towards raspberries, grapes and blueberries for fruits.

The vegetables I use are spinach, avocado, broccoli, kale and sweet bell peppers.

For nuts and seeds- to increase the Omega 3 content- I’ve been adding a mixture of linseed, sunflower seeds and goji berries. I quite like the crunch the seeds give.

I add a clean protein powder to one smoothie and have it as a snack, the other daily mix I have either after my high protein breakfast or mid morning.

Try it they’re delicious. Its too early to know if they help with menopause symptoms. But, I will let you know how I get on.

Now, I’m off to make sage and lemon balm tea!!

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Eat Clean. Live Well. Feel Great!

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12 Tips to Reduce or Avoid Dementia and Alzheimer symptoms…. May 19, 2014

12 Tips to Reduce or Avoid Dementia and Alzheimer symptoms….

1. Optimise vitamin D. In 2007 researchers at the University of Wisconsin uncovered strong links between low levels of vitamin D in Alzheimer’s patients and poor outcomes on cognitive tests. Scientists launched the study after family members of Alzheimer’s patients who were treated with large doses of prescription vitamin D reported that they were acting and performing better than before.6
Researchers believe that optimal vitamin D levels may enhance the amount of important biomolecules in your brain and protect brain cells. Vitamin D receptors have been identified throughout the human body, and that includes in your brain. Metabolic pathways for vitamin D exist in the hippocampus and cerebellum of the brain, areas that are involved in planning, processing of information, and the formation of new memories.

2. Sufficient vitamin D is also imperative for the proper functioning of your immune system to combat excessive inflammation, and, as mentioned earlier, other research has discovered that people with Alzheimer’s tend to have higher levels of inflammation in their brains.

3. Fructose. Ideally it is important to keep your level below 25 grams per day. This toxic influence is serving as an important regulator of brain toxicity. Since the average person is exceeding this recommendation by 300% this is a pervasive and serious issue. I view this as the MOST important step you can take. Additionally, when your liver is busy processing fructose (which your liver turns into fat), it severely hampers its ability to make cholesterol. This is yet another important facet that explains how and why excessive fructose consumption is so detrimental to your health.

4. Keep your fasting insulin levels below 3. This is indirectly related to fructose, as it will clearly lead to insulin resistance. However other sugars, grains and lack of exercise are also factors here.

5. Vitamin B12

(more…)

 

Photography Improves Memory October 23, 2013

Filed under: Fun,Health — jax allen @ 1:30 pm
Tags: , , , ,

I spotted this article in the press this week….

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Learning photography may keep an ageing mind sharp
Learning a mentally demanding skill such as photography can improve cognitive functioning in older adults, a new study has found.

However, less demanding activities, such as listening to classical music or completing word puzzles, probably won’t bring noticeable benefits to an ageing mind, scientists said.

“It seems it is not enough just to get out and do something – it is important to get out and do something that is unfamiliar and mentally challenging, and that provides broad stimulation mentally and socially,” said psychological scientist and lead researcher Denise Park of the University of Texas at Dallas.

“When you are inside your comfort zone you may be outside of the enhancement zone,” Park said.

For their study, Park and colleagues randomly assigned 221 adults, ages 60 to 90, to engage in a particular type of activity for 15 hours a week over the course of three months.

Some participants were assigned to learn a new skill – digital photography, quilting, or both – which required active engagement and tapped working memory, long-term memory and other high-level cognitive processes.

Other participants were instructed to engage in more familiar activities at home, such as listening to classical music and completing word puzzles.

And, to account for the possible influence of social contact, some participants were assigned to a social group that included social interactions, field trips, and entertainment.

At the end of three months, Park and colleagues found that the adults who were productively engaged in learning new skills showed improvements in memory compared to those who engaged in social activities or non-demanding mental activities at home.

Researchers now plan on following up with the participants one year and five years down the road to see if the effects remain over the long term.

“This is speculation, but what if challenging mental activity slows the rate at which the brain ages? Every year that you save could be an added year of high quality life and independence,” Park said.

The study will appear in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

JaxAllenFitness.com