Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Armchair Athlete? November 12, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:35 am
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 Adapted from an article ….

Sports Performance Bulletin

Issue No. 225, November 9, 2015

  
This article is very interesting…. I know what he means. I’ve been teaching multiple fitness classes most days since 1983, some days it feels like 1883! 

Maintaining muscle mass, good quality sleep and eating protein IS key! 

Tips for the Ageing (armchair) Athlete 

From

David Joyce

Editor, Sports Performance Bulletin

Tips for the ageing athlete 

  
One of the reasons I love working in sport is that you are constantly surrounded by young people and their questionable fashion, language and music! I firmly believe that you’re only as old as you want to be, and that there’s a marked difference between being aged and being old.
Age is something that happens due to the inexorable passing of time, and there are certain strategies that we can implement to ensure that we lessen the decay that Father Time wants to impart.
Firstly, a decline in muscle power doesn’t just creep up. It hits you square in the face. A fall that leads to a fractured hip is one of the biggest causes of so-called age-related hospital admissions in the Western World. We know, that a huge part of this stems back to poor muscle strength and power.
So, is there anything we can do about this? Of course there is! 
You are never too old to lift heavy things! Sure, there may be a decline in what you can lift when you’re 80 compared to when you’re 35, but there is stacks of scientific research that has been done that demonstrates that even 90 year-olds can gain both muscle size and strength following a targeted strength programme. 
The most effective exercises are the ones that you do, so, in other words, any exercise that has an overload demand attached to it will develop strength. Should we teach a 60 year old to power clean if they’ve never done it before? Possibly not, because this complex lift is as much about skill as it is about strength, but if the 60 year old is well trained in its technique, there’s no reason why they shouldn’t continue to lift in this manner. 
Often, the time it takes to recover following a strength session is longer as we get older. This needs to be taken into account when planning training, in particular taking care to space out plyometric work, even for the masters athlete that is well attuned to this activity. 
In terms of nutrition, there is now plenty of evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of a diet high in protein being especially important for the mature athlete, to counteract the sarcopaenia (muscle fibre loss) that coincides with increasing number of candles on the birthday cake.

Interesting…. I know what he means. I’ve been teaching multiple fitness classes most days since 1983, some days it feels like 1883! 

Maintaining muscle mass, good quality sleep and eating protein IS key! 

Jax  

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Eggs Evil Cholesterol Bombs? November 8, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:30 am
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“Eggs Are Evil”</strong

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This one hits close to home because delicious omelets are one of my favourite foods. Eggs get a bad rap because they contain a large amount of cholesterol, therefore people think eggs will increase their risk of heart disease.

Lucky for you and I, science is showing that cholesterol in the diet doesn’t really raise the cholesterol in the blood. Eggs actually have the opposite impact. Eggs raise the “good” cholesterol and are not shown to increase the risk of heart disease. 1 2

Here’s the truth: Eggs are one of the most nutrient dense foods in the grocery store. They are loaded with a variety of nutrients and even powerful antioxidants to protect your eyes. 3

Eat Clean. train Smart. Feel Great

Jax

References
1. http://www.bmj.com/content/346/bmj.e8539
2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19369056
3. http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/70/2/247.short

 

12 Ancient Grains September 19, 2014

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:04 am
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12 Ancient Grains that you should consider.

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Grains like wheat, corn, oats, and rice are the most popular on the market, but ancient grains are making a comeback. Now available in many specialty health food stores like Whole Foods, these delicious grains offer more of a variety of tastes, textures, and nutrients. Some of them are even gluten-free, making them a great alternative for grain-lovers suffering from gluten intolerances. Try one (or all) of the tasty grains on our list below.

1. Polenta

A staple in Northern Italian cooking, polenta is made from ground yellow or white corn that has had the germ removed. This gluten-free, complex carbohydrate has more protein than a large egg (8.1 g per serving), and is a great alternative to bread and pasta. A single serving of polenta provides six percent of the recommended daily amount of vitamin A and 10 percent of the daily amount of vitamin C. Stone-ground whole grain cornmeal polenta is the healthiest choice. Polenta made from whole grain corn also supplies good amounts of iron, thiamin, zinc, phosphorous, and magnesium. Serve up polenta baked, boiled, or grilled as a main or side dish.

2. Bulgur

A great alternative to rice or couscous and often used in soups and salads, bulgur is a grain often used in Middle Eastern cuisine. It’s made from hard red wheat and sometimes softer, white wheat. Bulgur is high in fibre (18.3 g per serving) and manganese. It also contains 26 percent of your recommended daily needs of niacin, 14 percent of iron, and 17 percent of vitamin B6. Quick and easy to cool, bulgur can blend easily with toasted nuts (walnuts, pine nuts, pecans), berries, or sauteed veggies to make a healthy side dish. It also goes great with chicken and beef. Try blending bulgur with wheat berries and quinoa to create a fresh, light side dish.

3. Amaranth

One of the world’s oldest grains, amaranth is a South American grain that can be used in place of rice. Both gluten- and wheat-free, amaranth is high in protein (9 g per cup) and amino acids that help build brain cells like lysine, cysteine, and methionine, which aren’t found in as high concentrations in other grains. A single serving of amaranth has up to seven percent of vitamin C, 42 percent of iron, and 16 percent of calcium needs for the day. Cook amaranth in water or chicken stock with vegetables for dinner. It’s nutty, malty taste also makes it a perfect choice for breakfast when blended with nuts, dried fruit, and milk.

4. Farro

Farro, also referred to as emmer, is a wheat grain that was one of the first domesticated crops in the Fertile Crescent thousands of years ago and was used in Egyptian bread making. Farro is high in fibre (5 g per serving) and protein (6 g per serving) and provides 20 percent of your daily needs for niacin and 15 percent of your daily needs for magnesium and zinc. Farro is commonly used in Italy as a whole grain in soup, pasta, risotto, and salad dishes. It can also be used to make bread and baked goods.

5. Spelt

Spelt is an ancient grain that was commonly eaten in medieval times. While it’s part of the wheat family, people with wheat intolerances are often able to eat spelt. A single serving of spelt is high is in fibre (5 g) and protein (6 g), and provides 14 percent of the daily recommended value of magnesium and zinc, and 25 percent of iron. Spelt can be used in place or rice and pasta, used as an oatmeal alternative, or used to make muffins, waffles, pancakes, and bread.

6. Wheat Berries

A wheat berry is the entire wheat kernel, including the bran, endosperm, and germ, meaning it is a whole grain. The third most abundant crop worldwide, following rice and corn, wheat berries are a great source of healthy carbohydrates. Nutrient count varies depending on the type of wheat berries you select. They can be soft or hard and come in a variety of colors. Overall, wheat berries are high in fiber and protein and contain a variety of nutrients including vitamin E, calcium, B vitamins, folate, and potassium. Eat wheat berries in place of pasta, rice, and other grains, or use them in salads and side dishes. They’re also a great alternative to oatmeal when blended with fresh fruit and nuts.

7. Buckwheat

Buckwheat groats, also called kasha, are hulled grains from the buckwheat plant often found in Eastern Europe and Russia. Buckwheat is low in fat and offers eight percent of the daily value of niacin, six percent for vitamin B6, four percent for riboflavin and thiamin, 21 percent for magnesium, 12 percent for copper and phosphorous, and 7 percent for iron and zinc. It also contains all essential amino acids, making it a complete protein which helps with muscle-building. Add cooked buckwheat to salads, use it as a side dish, or add fruit and honey for a healthy oatmeal alternative.

8. Millet

Millet is a small, whole grain food that is a staple grain in many Asian and African countries. Whole grains like millet have been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer, and millet has also been shown to decrease the incidence of stomach ulcers. A cup of millet has just 207 calories, 6 g of protein, and 2 g of fibre. It’s also cholesterol-free and only has 3 mg of sodium per serving. Millet is also gluten-free. Quick to brown in a frying pan or pot, millet can be mixed with seasoned veggies, meats, spicy beans, and other flavorful foods.

9. Kamut

A form of grain grown in many cultures and is believed to have first been grown in Egypt or Asia, kamut is two to three times the size of common wheat and has 20-40 percent more protein and 65 percent more amino acids. Kamut is also high in essential fatty acids, which can help lower bad LDL-cholesterol and raise good HDL-cholesterol. It’s a particularly good source for thiamin, niacin, folate, riboflavin, vitamin B6, vitamin E, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, and complex carbohydrates. Similar to dried beans, kamut needs to soak for several hours before cooking. Once cooked, use it to replace rice in side dishes or use kamut powder for baking.

10. Quinoa
(My favourite for porridge)
Found in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, Chile, and Peru, quinoa means “mother grain” in Inca. Quinoa is a complete protein, meaning it has all nine essential amino acids, which have been shown to boost immunity, improve muscle quality, and regulate hormone production. It’s also a great source of high-quality protein (8 g per serving), fibre, and riboflavin, thiamin, and niacin, which help your body metabolize energy. Quinoa provides 20 percent of the iron and phosphorus that you require every day, along with 9 percent of potassium and 2 percent of calcium. A versatile, delicious grain, quinoa can easily substitute for rice and couscous in recipes, or serve it with fresh veggies.

11. Barley

Barley is a rich, bulky grain originally from Ethiopia and Southwest Asia. A nutrient dense food, barley is high in fibre, B vitamins, iron, copper, manganese, and selenium. This blend of nutrients has been linked to increased immunity and a more efficient metabolism. Barley is also low in calories and not as starchy as pasta and rice. Before cooking, always rinse barley thoroughly and use 3 cups of water for every cup of barley. Use barley flower to make breads, muffins, and cookies, stir-fry it with vegetables, or blend it stews and soups.

12. Teff

Teff, the world’s smallest grain, is made from the seed of an Ethiopian grass and made up mostly of bran and germ. This gluten-free, nutrient-dense grain contains high-quality carbs, protein (26 g per serving), minerals, and fibre, and is high in the nutrients calcium, thiamin, and iron (it has twice as much as wheat and barley). Uncooked teff can be used in baking cakes, breads, and muffins in place of small grains or seeds. For a meal, blend teff into soups and stews. It serves as a nutritious thickening agent, making it great for heavier, cool weather meals.

Eat Clean. Stay Active. Feel Great.
Jax

 

4/13 Lies That Make You Fat and Sick – Protein November 9, 2013

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:30 am
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4. Eating a Lot of Protein is Bad For Your Health
Many people believe that eating a lot of protein can damage your bones.

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While it is true that increased protein can increase calcium excretion from the bones in the short term, the long term studies show the exact opposite effect.

In fact, eating more protein is consistently associated with improved bone density and a lower risk of fracture in old age (27, 28, 29).

This is one example of where blindly following conventional nutrition advice will lead to the exact opposite result.

Another myth is that protein increases strain on the kidneys and contributes to kidney failure.

The reality is a bit more complicated than that. Although it is true that people with established kidney disease should reduce protein intake, studies in healthy individuals show that protein is perfectly safe (30, 31).

In healthy individuals, protein actually reduces two of the main risk factors for kidney disease… which are diabetes and high blood pressure (32, 33, 34).

Eating a high protein diet has many other benefits, including increased muscle mass, reduced body fat and a lower risk of diseases like cardiovascular disease (35, 36, 37).

Bottom Line: Studies show that protein has positive effects on bone health in the long run and does not raise the risk of kidney disease in healthy individuals. Eating a high protein diet has many important health benefits.

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Thanks Jax

 

Stay Youthful #5 Combine Foods July 14, 2013

Stay Youthful Combine Foods

How to Lower the Glycemic Index of a Food
Not every carbohydrate we eat is going to have as low of a GI as we want it to. Fortunately, there are some things you can do to lower the GI of your meal, and slow the release of glucose into the blood.

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1. Add Fat – Adding fat to your meal slows down gastric emptying (the speed at which food leaves your stomach) and therefore slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream. This is one of the benefits of combining fats and carbohydrates in the same meal.

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2. Add Fibre – Fibre also slows down gastric emptying. Because of this, it gives you a much slower release of glucose. It also has the added benefit of adding bulk to your meal – helping to control hunger.

3. Combine with a Lower GI Food – The glycemic index is somewhat of a math equation. It adds up all the food you eat and takes an average. Eating a lower GI food with a high GI food will help lower the overall GI effect of your meal.

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3. Eat Protein with Your Meal – Protein isn’t a carbohydrate, but it still has a glycemic response. Protein is broken down via digestion, just like every other food you eat. Therefore, it does have an effect on blood sugar. The good thing is that whole food protein sources have an extremely low GI, and when combined with a carbohydrate source, they will dramatically lower the overall GI of your meal.

4. Use the Glycemic Index to Formulate Your Meals
Now that you know what the glycemic index is and how it influences your fat loss, you can put together a meal plan that will help your weight loss.
Think of it as a way of eating, because eating lots of low-glycemic foods is quite easy to do.

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5. Eat non-processed carbohydrate sources.
Carbohydrates like fruits, vegetables, legumes, tubers, and some grains are typically low on the GI scale. Beans tend to be the lowest because of their high fibre content.
Most fruits and vegetables are fairly low GI, as well as some tubers such as sweet potatoes.

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6. Have a source of protein with each of your meals, some healthy fats here and there, and low GI carbohydrates that are high in fibre will help your body to lose fat.

Follow these rules and you’ll control your blood sugar level, insulin response and so give your system a chance to stay healthy and youthful!
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Beat Ageing with Food #9 June 11, 2013

Filed under: Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 10:18 am
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9. Chomp on chicken to stay young

Chicken, again? Don’t feel bad about serving this standby — when you put it on the table, you’re holding up a stop sign to the aging process. Spice it up with metabolic seasonings and marinades.
You can make this simple meat taste very different every day of the week.

If you haven’t already discovered foil pocket or pouch baking, you should give it a go.
Make a foil pouch for your piece or pieces of chicken, add your chosen herbs and spices. Seal loosely- bake in the oven till cooked, juicy and tender. I batch cook 3 days worth at a time, store in the fridge till I need it. No more ‘ i don’t have time’ excuses.

Poultry is high in zinc and selenium, two minerals that balance hormones and promote collagen production.
It also defends against free radical damage, which harms cells and accelerates aging.

The result: you’re the spring chicken!

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Was Your Doctor DEAD WRONG About This ONE Food? April 24, 2013

Was Your Doctor DEAD WRONG  About This ONE Food?

[found this one and I agree completely]

By Kevin DiDonato MS, CSCS, CES

This morning, I did what a lot of people may do: I cooked some eggs for breakfast.

But not all the eggs were whole!  In fact, I used only one whole egg and the rest egg whites in order to make my vegetable omelet.

Now, the reason for this is pretty simple: I LOVE eggs!

They are full of high-quality proteins that my body needs in order to repair and regenerate the many cells in my body.

But a lot of people – and there are more than you may think – avoid eggs due to the cholesterol found in the yolk.

They may be worried about heart disease…

Or altered cholesterol levels…

Maybe you’re even worried about high blood pressure.

Whatever the reason, you should know this: eggs should be an IMPORTANT nutrient to include in your daily or weekly menu plans for breakfast.

Why?

As previously mentioned, eggs have high-quality proteins that are important for many functions including repair and growth of lean muscle mass.

And, if you’re worried about the cholesterol found in eggs and it leading to higher cholesterol levels, don’t be!  A recent study showed that the cholesterol found in eggs did very little to raise your total or LDL cholesterol levels.

But if you truly are concerned, then including egg WHITES would provide you with high quality proteins WITHOUT adding any cholesterol to your day.

It may also provide something else…

And, if you have high blood pressure, you should pay very close attention to this…

Egg Whites and Blood Pressure

Egg whites contain a peptide – which is one of the building blocks of protein – called RVPSL.

And this peptide, when digested by your body, may lower your blood pressure – similar to a low-dose of some common ACE inhibiting medications.

ACE – which stands for angiotensin converting enzyme – has been shown to increase blood pressure by forcing your blood vessels to constrict – a process where angiotensin I is converted by this enzyme into angiotensin II.

This constriction leads to the blood moving at the same rate through the blood vessel, just with a narrower chamber.  And this is what creates that spike in pressure.

Now, drugs called ACE inhibitors prevent the activity of this enzyme, therefore preventing the conversion of angiotensin I, therefore lowering blood pressure.

And guess what?

A new study, presented at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, shows that the peptide found in egg whites – RVPSL – may lower blood pressure as effectively as a low-dose of the most popular ACE inhibiting medications.

Here’s what the study found:

First, they wanted to see if RVPSL was able to reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

They tested the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the rats at 5, 10, 15, and 20 hours post-administration of RVPSL.

They found that 50 mg/kg of BW was comparable to a 10 mg/kg dose of Catopril (ACE inhibitor).

Meaning, a 50 mg dose was able to lower blood pressure similar to what would be seen in a low dose of the ACE inhibiting medication
Catopril.

Their conclusion:

“Therefore, egg white protein peptide may be useful to prevent or treat hypertension.”

More Eggs, Please!

Eggs, which provide high-quality proteins and good fats, should be part of a healthy breakfast.

Concerned about the yolk in eggs?  Don’t be!

The cholesterol found in yolk has been shown to NOT impact cholesterol levels like once thought.

And now, according to this study, egg whites may contain a peptide that is as effective at lowering blood pressure as some of the low-dose ACE inhibiting medications on the market today.

So you see, eggs are a potent source of nutrition that may not only improve your health, but may add positive benefits to your health.

All this in one incredible and very edible little egg!