Super Seniors Fitness Solutions

Keys to Living Well, Feeling Great & Enjoying Life

Study – exercise Means Better Memory November 30, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 11:00 pm
Tags: , , , ,

Another study shows exercise means better memory for senior citizens



Many studies find fitness equals better mental ability – this one links it mostly to long-term memory

By Tucker Sutherland, editor, SeniorJournal.com

Nov. 24, 2015 – A new study released today declares that older adults who take more steps than most by walking or jogging performed better on memory tasks. Really, how could this be news? It is just another way of looking at physical fitness and how it enhances memory and cognitive ability. But, this one does find a new twist.

 As the editor of SeniorJournal.com for 16 years I have reported on dozens of studies that have come up with the same result – physical fitness, which can be obtained in many ways, helps people stay mentally fit as they age.

I’m not complaining but I am declaring this is an established reality – exercise equals better mental performance as people age. 

This research started with the question, “Could staying physically active improve quality of life by delaying cognitive decline and prolonging an independent lifestyle?”

 

“Absolutely,” is the answer I could have provided before their study. It has been proven in dozens of studies – maybe hundreds – that primarily have varied only by the technique used to gain the physical fitness – running, walking, swimming, weight-lifting, dancing, hula hoop, etc.





The differences in this study is it looked at groups of both young and old adults. Which leadsthem to look at long-term versus short-term memory.

The report appears online in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.

The study included 29 young adults (ages 18-31) and 31 older adults (ages 55-82) who wore a small device called an ActiGraph, which recorded information including how many steps each took, how vigorous the steps were and how much time it involved. These are used in many, many studies of physical exercise.

Participants also completed neuropsychological testing to assess their memory, planning and problem-solving abilities. 

In addition to standardized neuropsychological tasks of executive function (planning and organization abilities) and long-term memory, participants engaged in a laboratory task in which they had to learn face-name associations. 

The researchers found that older adults who took more steps per day had better memory performance. 

And, what will appeal to many elderly, the association between the number of steps taken was strongest with a task that required recalling which name went with a person’s face – the same type of everyday task that older adults often have difficulty with. 

In young adults, the number of steps taken was not associated with memory performance.

It is long-term memory that is improved by activity

This lead them to the conclusion that the effects of physical activity extend to long-term memory – the same type of memory that is negatively impacted by aging and neurodegenerative dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease. 

”Our findings that physical activity is positively associated with memory is appealing for a variety of reasons. Everyone knows that physical activity is a critical component to ward off obesity and cardiovascular-related disease. Knowing that a lack of physical activity may negatively impact one’s memory abilities will be an additional piece of information to motivate folks to stay more active,” explained corresponding author Scott Hayes, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine and the Associate Director of the Neuroimaging Research for Veterans Center at the VA Boston Healthcare System.

The authors point out that staying physically active can take a variety of forms from formal exercise programs to small changes, such as walking or taking the stairs. 

“More research is needed to explore the specific mechanisms of how physical activity may positively impact brain structure and function as well as to clarify the impact of specific exercise programs (e.g., strength, aerobic, or combined training) or dose of exercise (frequency, intensity, duration) on a range of cognitive functions,” added Hayes.

The authors say that the objective measurement of physical activity was a key component of their study, because the majority of studies to date have used self-report questionnaires, which can be impacted by memory failures or biases.

This work was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation Research & Development Service and Clinical Science Research & Development Service [MV]. Assistance with participant recruitment was provided by the Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (P50-AG005134) and Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Center (P30-AG13846).



Advertisements
 

Armchair Athlete? November 12, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health,Nutrition — jax allen @ 8:35 am
Tags: , , , , , , ,

 Adapted from an article ….

Sports Performance Bulletin

Issue No. 225, November 9, 2015

  
This article is very interesting…. I know what he means. I’ve been teaching multiple fitness classes most days since 1983, some days it feels like 1883! 

Maintaining muscle mass, good quality sleep and eating protein IS key! 

Tips for the Ageing (armchair) Athlete 

From

David Joyce

Editor, Sports Performance Bulletin

Tips for the ageing athlete 

  
One of the reasons I love working in sport is that you are constantly surrounded by young people and their questionable fashion, language and music! I firmly believe that you’re only as old as you want to be, and that there’s a marked difference between being aged and being old.
Age is something that happens due to the inexorable passing of time, and there are certain strategies that we can implement to ensure that we lessen the decay that Father Time wants to impart.
Firstly, a decline in muscle power doesn’t just creep up. It hits you square in the face. A fall that leads to a fractured hip is one of the biggest causes of so-called age-related hospital admissions in the Western World. We know, that a huge part of this stems back to poor muscle strength and power.
So, is there anything we can do about this? Of course there is! 
You are never too old to lift heavy things! Sure, there may be a decline in what you can lift when you’re 80 compared to when you’re 35, but there is stacks of scientific research that has been done that demonstrates that even 90 year-olds can gain both muscle size and strength following a targeted strength programme. 
The most effective exercises are the ones that you do, so, in other words, any exercise that has an overload demand attached to it will develop strength. Should we teach a 60 year old to power clean if they’ve never done it before? Possibly not, because this complex lift is as much about skill as it is about strength, but if the 60 year old is well trained in its technique, there’s no reason why they shouldn’t continue to lift in this manner. 
Often, the time it takes to recover following a strength session is longer as we get older. This needs to be taken into account when planning training, in particular taking care to space out plyometric work, even for the masters athlete that is well attuned to this activity. 
In terms of nutrition, there is now plenty of evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of a diet high in protein being especially important for the mature athlete, to counteract the sarcopaenia (muscle fibre loss) that coincides with increasing number of candles on the birthday cake.

Interesting…. I know what he means. I’ve been teaching multiple fitness classes most days since 1983, some days it feels like 1883! 

Maintaining muscle mass, good quality sleep and eating protein IS key! 

Jax  

 

Avoid Hospital!! May 2, 2015

Filed under: Fitness,Health,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 7:16 am
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Download the 5 Ways Guide to Prevent Senior Hospitalizations

 

This article is very interesting, especially if you care for a senior at home. 
A simple checklist to remind you to notice warning signs. 
I love the points about staying active – just walking to visit a friend every day and eating a varied diet will have a massive effect on wellness and independent living. 
Follow the link to download the article. 
Jax. 
 

10 Tips To Prevent Falls October 2, 2014

Filed under: Fitness,Health — jax allen @ 4:45 pm
Tags: , , , ,

I found this article on Huffington Post

It is based on our American cousins – but it works here too!

IMG_1621.JPG

They suggest calling a friend if you feel lonely or isolated – I’d say find a Seniors exercise group and go often!

Article: http://huff.to/1rlSRZu

Move Strong: 10 Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Falls
Celeste Carlucci 09/23/14 12:19 PM ET

1. Never put your underpants on standing up. It might sound like a no-brainer, but I can’t tell you how many older adults still take the chance of putting on their pants or underpants without stabilizing themselves by holding onto something or sitting.

2. Step on the leash to pick up the poo. Don’t risk Fido getting frisky, pulling you off balance, and sending you flying! Keep your dog close, take firm hold of the leash, then step on it while you bend down to clean up after your dog.

3. Be warned. If you think “This is unsafe — but I’ll take care of it later,” don’t wait! Often you’re not hurt “by accident,” but “by lack of action.” If I had a nickel for every time I’ve heard “I knew I should have closed the dishwasher door; picked up the magazines off the floor; tucked away that loose computer cable before leaving the room to answer the phone, the doorbell, to go to the bathroom, check emails, take a nap,” etc. Eliminate a problem when you first see it.

4. Hold the staircase railing whether you think you need to or not. Same rule applies to escalators. You never know when someone behind or ahead of you might lose his or her balance and come tumbling down. Your falls won’t always be your fault, so be alert to your environment and be cautious.

5. Gents, if you must reach in your back pocket for your wallet, and Ladies, if you need to dig into your purse — especially if your balance is a bit shaky — first, stop what you’re doing (walking, chatting with a friend, talking on your cell phone). Pause. Now proceed to look for the big bucks.

6. Don’t even think you can step over that low hedge or fence, box in the supermarket aisle, or low-hanging rope divider. Yes, people do this! And maybe when you were 20 and in a hurry you could, too. But at this age, don’t take that risk. It isn’t worth it.

7. As soon as you get the walk sign, go! If the sign has started blinking, it’s too late. Set out right away, so you never have to rush.

8. Don’t run to catch the bus, catch your grandchild, or catch your dog. I’ve seen some of the fittest older adults suffer terrible accidents trying to run across the street, play Frisbee with their dog, or play hide-and-seek with their grandkids on snow and ice.

9. Be aware of stepladders. There it is, in that high cupboard: your favorite serving platter or baking dish. If you can’t store it in a lower cupboard, then proceed with caution. Never take both hands off the ladder — especially to change an overhead light bulb. Just say no. Invite a friend to help you. A free tip from a class participant who fell off her stepladder: If you live alone, wear a medical alert device. Seriously injured, she lay several hours on the floor before someone found her.

10. When you’re feeling blue, call a friend. Being alone and isolated can increase your risk for a fall. When you remove yourself socially, stay at home more and more, your activity level drops dramatically, which leads to weaker muscles and depression. Get out with a friend and enjoy a cup of coffee together, or even better, sign up to take an exercise class together.

Remember, change begins with you. Take prevention seriously.

We all need to do the things that help us, help our family and friends move strong and reduce the risk for falls.

Be Active. Feel Better

Jax

IMG_1625.JPG

 

New SIT & BE FIT CLASS in Gloucester UK May 9, 2014

20140509-084910.jpg

Take Heart support group opens it’s doors to all needing to improve their balance, strength and posture.

Often as we age we develop a range of health problems that effect our balance and ability to get around this can make regular exercise sessions too noisy, too fast or just too much!

So, we’ve developed SIT & BE FIT – mobility scooter and walker friendly, we use chairs or your own scooter or wheel chair to give support while we tone and activate muscles, mobilise and loosen joints and improve postural strength.

If you, or someone you know might benefit from gentle effective exercise based on Pilates and Yoga principles get in touch for a FREE Trial.
Partners and carers are welcome, we meet on Mondays and Fridays with a nice chatty refreshment break between sessions at 11:00. Come for coffee and meet us all.

We are a happy, social bunch, with regular walks, trips and raffles.

Meet People, Have Fun, Make Friends

 

Amazing Super Seniors #20 February 12, 2014

Filed under: Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 8:00 am
Tags: , ,

Super seniors #20

20140207-180736.jpg

Hershel McGriff: The NASCAR Veteran
Life is a (very fast) highway for Hershel McGriff. He started racing cars in 1945; in 1989, at age 61, he became the oldest driver to win a NASCAR race.

But he hasn’t turned off the ignition yet: At 81, he recently competed in a national NASCAR race at Portland International Raceway, finishing 13th. NASCAR racing may be dangerous, but that doesn’t faze this Motorsports Hall of Famer.

Perhaps it’s this need for speed that keeps McGriff young at heart. “As long as I’m fast, I’m [having fun],” he said on his Web site.

Jax x

 

Amazing Super Seniors #19 February 10, 2014

Filed under: Fun,Senior Moments — jax allen @ 8:00 am
Tags: , ,

Super seniors # 19

20140207-180344.jpg

Jeannie Epper: The Senior Superhero

Many consider her “the greatest stuntwoman who’s ever lived,” according to Entertainment Weekly. Epper may be a great-grandmother, but that doesn’t stop her from jumping through glass windows and escaping from burning buildings at the ripe age of 70. In the 1970s, she served as Lynda Carter’s stunt double in the TV series Wonder Woman. Today she still performs stunts in such movies as The Back-Up Plan, The Fast and the Furious, and Kill Bill.

In fact, she’s cheated death in more than 100 Hollywood films, and she received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Taurus World Stunt Awards in 2009. Does Epper ever worry about her safety? Confidence may be the key to her success: ”As far as I’m concerned, whenever I do a stunt, it’s 150 percent going to work out,” she told EW.